something boiling

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moyeea

Senior Member
Chinese-China
Hello
if my friend say:

Go to the kitchen right now! Something boiling may cause fire!

Here can I say" something boiling?"

Thanks so much!
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Going by smell only, I would say, "I smell something burning!" or "Something's burning!"

    If it seemed a real emergency, then, "Something's burning! Quick! The kitchen!"
     

    moyeea

    Senior Member
    Chinese-China
    It would be more usual to convey this exciting piece of important news with a main clause, a sentence of its own: Something is boiling (over) in the kitchen!
    Thanks for your help!

    But “something boiling may cause fire“ This sentenceis correct?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Seriously I doubt it. Boiling water / food does not cause fires, in my experience of kitchen dramas.
    I agree with the Kitchen Drama Queen :D, the worst I've seen in "boiling over" is spaggetti sauce burned onto the stove top.

    I did manage to allow "hard boiled eggs" to completely boil dry, and that was a serious and smelly error. But that was not "boiling" at that point; it more properly was baking or roasting.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    But “something boiling may cause fire“ Is this sentence correct?
    Seriously I doubt it. Boiling water / food does not cause fires, in my experience of kitchen dramas.
    In addition to that, the sentence also sounds like a general statement like "Cats may eat grass (if they are very hungry)." rather than something that is happening now. "Something boiling may catch fire (if it is flammable)."
    There is something boiling that may cause a fire.
     
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