something is omitted or reduced?

Discussion in 'English Only' started by RomanPinsEveryone, May 1, 2017.

  1. RomanPinsEveryone

    RomanPinsEveryone Senior Member

    Chinese
    Hello everyone, I saw a sentence:
    You can order some food and sit there for a long time chatting with friends.


    I don't know why it puts a gerund after " sit there for a long time ".

    please help, what words are omitted or reduced?

    thank you !




     
  2. owlman5

    owlman5 Senior Member

    Colorado
    English-US
    Here "chatting" is a participle that serves as an adjective which modifies "you". I don't much care for participles used at such a distance from the nouns and pronouns they modify. However, I see and hear them fairly frequently. This sentence seems clearer to me, and it means the same thing: You can order some food and sit there for a long time as you chat with friends.
     
  3. london calling Senior Member

    SALERNO, ITALY
    UK ENGLISH
    Nothing is omitted.:) It is a participial phrase: see this for a clear explanation (source: grammar-monster.com). There are also many previous threads on the subject: click here and scroll down.
     
  4. velisarius Senior Member

    Greece
    British English (Sussex)
    You can sit there. You can chat with friends while you sit there.

    If you like, You can sit there chatting with friends combines the two clauses, and we understand that the sitting and the chatting are occurring simultaneously. It's a very common construction, and nothing has been omitted.

     
  5. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    To me, nothing is omitted. Here is the main structure of the sentence:

    You can order some food and [you can] sit there [] chatting with friends.

    If you need to add a word to make the structure clearer, you can add 'while':

    You can order some food and [you can] sit there, while chatting with friends.
    If you prefer, you can rewrite the sentence without a participle, as people have done above.
     
  6. RomanPinsEveryone

    RomanPinsEveryone Senior Member

    Chinese

    Is this ok?

    You can order some food and sit there for a long time while you can chat with friends.

    thank you
     
  7. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    Yes, that's fine. :)

    Added: Except that you should remove 'can' from "can chat"

    You can order some food and sit there for a long time while you [] chat with friends.

    The 'can' at the beginning covers 'chat' as well.
     
  8. RomanPinsEveryone

    RomanPinsEveryone Senior Member

    Chinese

    You mean the second "can" is unnecessary to be on the sentence?
     
  9. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    I mean that we wouldn't use it. We wouldn't say "You can do this while you can do that." We would say "You can do this while you do that."
     
  10. RomanPinsEveryone

    RomanPinsEveryone Senior Member

    Chinese
    and this works too ?

    You can order some food and sit there for a long time while you are chatting with friends.
     
  11. kentix Senior Member

    English - U.S.
  12. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    I agree with kentix that your sentence in post #10 is fine. :)
     
  13. RomanPinsEveryone

    RomanPinsEveryone Senior Member

    Chinese
    Got it

    So, there are three variations.
    You can order some food and sit there for a long time as you chat with friends.
    You can order some food and sit there for a long time while you chat with friends.
    You can order some food and sit there for a long time while you are chatting with friends.


    But still, just like my previous question, it is impossible to set a limit on how many variations there might be on the original sentence.

    right?
     
  14. Cagey post mod (English Only / Latin)

    California
    English - US
    Yes, you are right. :)
     

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