son el pan de cada día para...

lauraspain

Member
Spain- Spanish
Hi again!

How do you translate "es nuestro pan de cada día"?
Meaning: it's something which has become usual, normal:

Context: "hot dogs and hamburgers are now el pan de cada día for many businessmen"

Thanks in advance
 
  • jrod

    Member
    USA-English
    To me, it would be like the Lords Prayer, "danos hoy nuestro pan de cada dia"
    or "give us this day our daily bread". In a sense it would probably mean our nourishment for the day.

    Hope this helps.


    Please feel free to correct me.
     

    daviesri

    Senior Member
    USA English
    lauraspain said:
    Hi again!

    How do you translate "es nuestro pan de cada día"?
    Meaning: it's something which has become usual, normal:

    Context: "hot dogs and hamburgers are now el pan de cada día for many businessmen"

    Thanks in advance

    El pan de cada día - daily bread / bread of the day


    The context is confusing since hotdogs and hamburgers are the meat and the bread together. The bread by itself is a 'bun'. Can 'el pan' mean 'meal'?

    Maybe the context should be :
    "hotdog buns and hamburger buns are now el pan de cada día for many businessmen"
     

    lauraspain

    Member
    Spain- Spanish
    Hi Jrod!
    I'm afraid I'm confused now. Your option would only be valid in the religious context, wouldn't it?

    What I mean is "it is very common". But thank you anyway coz I didn't know the sentence "Give us this day our daily bread" and now I know it.
    Thanks.

    .
    daviesri said:
    El pan de cada día - daily bread / bread of the day

    The context is confusing since hotdogs and hamburgers are the meat and the bread together. The bread by itself is a 'bun'. Can 'el pan' mean 'meal'?

    Maybe the context should be :
    "hotdog buns and hamburger buns are now el pan de cada día for many businessmen"

    No, that has nothing to do with the bread itself! I think I'm confusing everyone.

    In Spain sometimees we use this sentence when something happens always. For example:

    Las disputas entre mi marido y mi hijo son el pan nuestro de cada día últimamente.

    Sorry about being confusing
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    jrod

    Member
    USA-English
    Hey laura,

    Thanks. In a religious sense probably yes. In the way you use it, it probably translates to "daily occurance". I don't think there is a literal translation.
     

    Rebecca Hendry

    Senior Member
    United Kingdom - English
    In English we would say:

    "hot dogs and hamburgers are our bread and butter" (meaning that selling hot dogs and hamburgers is what gives us our day to day income)
     

    lauranazario

    Moderatrix
    Español puertorriqueño & US English
    cuchuflete said:
    In regard to the food example, I would say that they are 'everyday fare'.
    You took the words right of my mouth, Qxu! In addition:

    "hot dogs and hamburgers are now el pan de cada día for many businessmen" = today, hot dogs and hamburgers are a staple for many businessmen.

    Saludos,
    LN
     

    Sca

    Senior Member
    Argentina Spanish/ English
    Lauraspain: en tu primer ejemplo, prefiero lo que Lauranazario te sugiere,'staple'.
    En tu segundo ejemplo, creo que Jrod ha dado en el clavo, 'daily occurrence' como algo que acontece normalmente.:) :)
     

    Chaucer

    Senior Member
    US inglés/español
    lauraspain said:
    Hi again!

    How do you translate "es nuestro pan de cada día"?
    Meaning: it's something which has become usual, normal:

    Context: "hot dogs and hamburgers are now el pan de cada día for many businessmen"
    Thanks in advance

    It's our daily bread. = Es el pan nuestro de cada día.


    daily bread = literally, daily menu or food; or figuratively, as in pan de cada día a daily event, daily occurrence, habitual daily act.

    So if you want to keep the figurative sense, the translation would be daily bread.

    If you would like to eliminate the figurative sense of pan de cada día when translating into English, then you might want to write something like daily occurrence/ cosa de todos los días; staple/alimento base.
     

    Chaucer

    Senior Member
    US inglés/español
    Maika said:
    bread and butter is right

    Ello se refiere a medios financieros que le permiten a uno el comedero o ganarse la arepa/cocido/garbanzo/vida. Hay todo tipo de pan en la panadería metafórica.
     

    LadyBlakeney

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Maika said:
    bread and butter is right

    Maika, if you mean to say that "bread and butter" is a correct phrase, then you are right. However, it doesn't have the same meaning as "el pan de cada día" in the original sentence:

    "hot dogs and hamburgers are now el pan de cada día for many businessmen"

    This means that businessmen eat hot-dogs and hamburgers (almost) daily -they are a daily occurrence or a staple for them-, not that they make a living selling them-they would be the seller's bread and butter.

    I hope this helps.
     

    Maika

    Senior Member
    Mexico - Spanish
    LadyBlakeney said:
    Maika, if you mean to say that "bread and butter" is a correct phrase, then you are right. However, it doesn't have the same meaning as "el pan de cada día" in the original sentence:

    "hot dogs and hamburgers are now el pan de cada día for many businessmen"

    This means that businessmen eat hot-dogs and hamburgers (almost) daily -they are a daily occurrence or a staple for them-, not that they make a living selling them-they would be the seller's bread and butter.

    I hope this helps.

    Some years ago, I was translating an IT article, and found that phrase. It took me days to find out the meaning, and I understand it very well, it is not a literal translation, of course. The meaning does not have to do with eating =)
    It's something similar to what happened to me when I found "state of the art" in another article........ well, I also found the meaning, lots of work always, but wonderful.

    Regards,
     

    sedonasmiles

    New Member
    English - United States
    Everyday fare, Daily bread = Very good translations, true-to-meaning of "commonplace" or "habitual", which is the only implication of "el pan nuestro de cada día", and also maintain the food reference. Personally, I believe everyday fare is more frequently heard/used, but this could be regional.

    Staple = Could work, but does alter the meaning somewhat, because in addition to being common, it implies a degree of dependence, which is not the case in the Spanish expression. Bad things (like marital arguments) can also be "el pan de cada día".

    Bread and butter = Really has nothing to do with the Spanish phrase at all, implying a financial dependence on a profit-making activity or item. In this example, it doesn't apply, nor can I think of one when it could be used as a translation for "el pan nuestro de cada día", although it could be used for "nuestro pan", so careful not to confuse the two.
     

    missqpasa

    New Member
    english
    El pan de cada dia or el pan nuestro de cada dia literal translation is Every day's bread or our every day's bread. Metaphorically speaking el pan de cada dia means any blessings that help you to carry on each day be it food, bread, money, family, friends. It can also be used sarcastically as to an every day occurrence such as "My neighbours' dog barking is el pan de cada dia".
     

    StudentExpat

    New Member
    English - United States
    I live in Spain, and found this page through a search engine after wondering about a Spaniard's use of the phrase in conversation with me yesterday. I had just told him about a possible job opportunity, but stressed that it probably wouldn't work out, and that he shouldn't get his hopes up. He shrugged, and said such ultimately disappointing rumors were "pan de cada día" for him. So I'm inclined to second missqpasa's last sentence, above: a rueful, sarcastic comment, in the spirit of a comment like "Just what I needed!" in English.
     
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