son talent se révèle

  • Raghavan

    New Member
    Tamil, India
    Her talent was revealed (or discovered) once the teacher started teaching her.

    At the beginning she might have been considered to be just average, but under the expert guidance of her master, her talent came to the fore.

    The French sentence is very elegant.

    Regards,
    N.Raghavan
     

    cropje_jnr

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    Her talent was revealed (or discovered) once the teacher started teaching her.

    At the beginning she might have been considered to be just average, but under the expert guidance of her master, her talent came to the fore.

    The French sentence is very elegant.

    Regards,
    N.Raghavan
    The problem here is that a present tense sentence has become past tense. Of course, this may not matter, depending on the context.

    How about: Her talent begins to shine under the master's instruction or Under the master's instruction, her talent begins to shine through.

    Hopefully this retains some of that "elegance" ;)
     

    Raghavan

    New Member
    Tamil, India
    Of course the sentence is in present tense. But then this seems to refer to the events in the history of a person. In French as well as in German, I have seen the present tense is used in biographies.

    But after all this refers to an event in the past.

    If the English translator decides to follow the French style of rendering this in the past, then the translation of this sentence too will be so.

    Regards,
    N.Raghavan
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    Of course the sentence is in present tense. But then this seems to refer to the events in the history of a person. In French as well as in German, I have seen the present tense is used in biographies.

    But after all this refers to an event in the past.
    There's no context provided, so who could tell?

    Of course you are correct, Raghavan, that if this is a historical narrative French often uses the present tense. In English we would put it in the past in the same case.
     

    Raghavan

    New Member
    Tamil, India
    Even in English at times some journalists use the French/German style just to bring dynamism to the narrative. But I have never been comfortable with that.

    I remember reading a biography of Goethe in German, where the narrative was in present tense throughout. Initially I felt very uneasy with that. But afterwards I became used to that way of writing.

    Regards,
    N.Raghavan

    There's no context provided, so who could tell?

    Of course you are correct, Raghavan, that if this is a historical narrative French often uses the present tense. In English we would put it in the past in the same case.
     
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