soon, as soon as / early

ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
I have just read Dymn's thread and I wondered about the translations:
(1) do you have a specific word for 'soon' and 'as soon as'? (Maybe you could mention the expression 'sooner or leater' as well, because I see it is often associated with 'early', whereas in general there is a separate word for it) Other combinations welcome.

(2) Please also mention the specific word for 'early' as well, both adv. and adj.
Thanks!
 
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  • Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Russian does have a specific word corresponding to English "soon", although the usages aren't quite identical. Compare:

    ра́но (ráno) - early
    1. in the beginning of some time interval;
    2. sooner than it was desirable.

    ско́ро (skóro)
    1. soon; a short time after some particular moment;
    2. (archaic) fast

    бы́стро (býstro)
    1. fast (with high speed), adv.
    2. quickly (so that it occurs in a short period of time)

    But when it comes to comparative forms, the meanings may shift a bit:

    ра́ньше (rán'she)
    1. before;
    2. earlier (closer to the beginning of some time interval);
    3. sooner (before some other specified event occurs);
    4. in the old times.

    скоре́е (skoréye)
    1. more (X than Y); rather;
    2. more quickly;
    ~! - Quick! Hurry!
    3. faster (archaic, adv.);
    4. sooner (before some other specified event occurs; closer in the relative future to the specified moment).

    быстре́е (bystréye)
    1. faster;
    2. more quickly;
    ~! - Quick!
    3. sooner (before some other specified event occurs; closer in the relative future to the specified moment)
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    In French:

    soon (adverb) in the sense of "in a short time from now or from a given moment" (ex: I will be back soon, Soon after the beginning of the war):
    If from now: bientôt (ex: Je reviendrai bientôt)
    If from a given moment: juste après le début de la guerre, peu (de temps) après le début de la guerre

    early
    (adverb) in the sense of "near the beginning of a period of time" (ex: Early in the morning):
    tôt (ex: tôt le matin)

    early (adjective) in the sense of "concerning the beginning of a period of time" (ex: The early days):
    It depends on the expression:
    the early days of... = les débuts de...
    in the early hours = au petit matin, tôt le matin
    etc.

    as soon as (ex: as soon as possible):
    dès que (ex: dès que possible)
     
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    Dymn

    Senior Member
    Catalan

    "early" (as an adj): primerenc (but it's not as used as in English, there are various alternatives)
    "early": d'hora (Catalonia), enjorn (Valencia), prest (Majorca)
    "soon": aviat (Catalonia and Majorca), prompte (Valencia)

    However, the distinction is not clear-cut, and many people would use aviat where it should be d'hora, e.g. m'he llevat aviat (lit. "I got up soon"). This also seems to happen in Spain Spanish (not in Latin America): pronto ("soon") is often used where it should be temprano ("early"). In Valencian, this confusion seems to have reached a point that enjorn is considered outdated by many of them and they only use prompte.

    "sooner or later": tard o d'hora (at least in Catalonia)
    "as soon as": un cop ("once"), tan bon punt ("as good point"), en pic ("in peak", only in Western Catalonia afaik), en quant ("in how much", this is probably Spanish influence)

    Plus: "rather": més aviat (lit. "earlier", cf. French plutôt, Italian piuttosto)
     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    Italian :
    "early" : presto
    "soon" : subito (in some areas is also used "presto" as synonymous of "subito")

    Example :
    "early" : siamo usciti di casa la mattina presto (
    we left the house early in the morning)
    "soon" : ma siamo rincasati
    subito (but we returned home soon)

    Sardinian :
    "early" :
    chito (pronounce "kito", from Latin "cito" = early, quickly)
    "soon" :
    subitu / luego

    Example :
    "early" : semus essidos dae domo a manzanu
    chito (we left the house early in the morning)
    "soon" : ma semus recuìdos
    subitu / luego (but we returned home soon)
     
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    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    I have just read Dymn's thread and I wondered about the translations:
    (1) do you have a specific word for 'soon' and 'as soon as'? (Maybe you could mention the expression 'sooner or leater' as well, because I see it is often associated with 'early', whereas in general there is a separate word for it) Other combinations welcome.

    (2) Please also mention the specific word for 'early' as well, both adv. and adj.
    Thanks!
    Russian does have a specific word corresponding to English "soon", although the usages aren't quite identical. Compare:

    ра́но (ráno) - early
    1. in the beginning of some time interval; +/-idem as in English, I suppose
    2. sooner than it was desirable. Too early

    ско́ро (skóro)
    1. soon; a short time after some particular moment;
    2. (archaic) fast

    бы́стро (býstro)
    1. fast (with high speed), adv.
    2. quickly (so that it occurs in a short period of time)

    But when it comes to comparative forms, the meanings may shift a bit:

    ра́ньше (rán'she)
    1. before; in the sense of It happened before/ avant/ ... (= +/- in the old times)?
    2. earlier (closer to the beginning of some time interval);
    3. sooner (before some other specified event occurs);
    4. in the old times.

    скоре́е (skoréye) --- Is this a comparative? I suppose it is...
    1. more (X than Y); rather; as in it is rather good (almost very good)? Plutôt bien?
    2. more quickly;
    ~! - Quick! Hurry! Like /bystro/, 2, but comparative
    3. faster (archaic, adv.);
    4. sooner (before some other specified event occurs; closer in the relative future to the specified moment).

    быстре́е (bystréye)
    1. faster;
    2. more quickly;
    ~! - Quick!
    3. sooner (before some other specified event occurs; closer in the relative future to the specified moment)
    So
    - one translation for soon, three for sooner?
    - how about as soon as? как только , I see. But then : how would you explain '"as only..."? Why only? Any link with speed or time?
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    @Sardokan1.0 : oh yes, as in Subito santo/ santo subito. But mort subite (Belgian beer) is immediate death. I thought subito meant: rightaway. No?

    @Dymn: so quite some speakers mix them up. I thought it strange, but I could imagine people in Dutch saying: 'Hij komt snel' he comes fast, whereas I would not deem it the best word... But of course someone who is fast can come soon, I suppose...
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    - one translation for soon, three for sooner?
    Technically, yes, although the first one is the main option (others seem stylistically or lexically limited in some manner).
    ра́ньше (rán'she)
    1. before; in the sense of It happened before/ avant/ ... (= +/- in the old times)?
    In the sense "N1 V1 before (N2 V2)", much like in English, although to add a sentential argument one must use "раньше, чем..." (rán'she, chem...), lit. "before/earlier, than..."(In Russian, "before" is pretty much equal to "earlier" anyway).
    rather; as in it is rather good (almost very good)?
    As in "rather X than Y".
    Like /bystro/, 2, but comparative
    Not quite - because "быстро!" sounds very much like an order, while the comparative forms are rather prompting.
    But then : how would you explain '"as only..."?
    In what context? To start with, Russian doesn't use bare "as" as often as English does (especially considering it coinicides with "how" in Russian), and for "only" = "merely" there is a couple of other words and expressions. Generally the organization of clauses and other similar content is pretty different in Russian compared to English.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    No it means sudden death.
    That's what I come to realize now. My hypothesis is based on Flemish my dialect, where the French word is used in a sentence like "Kom sebiet hier"; meaning "Come here rightaway"? As "santo subito" means the same thing (rightaway, "ver y quickly" (our Forero dictionary here), I kept thinking that it meant "fast"...
     
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    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    In Russian, "before" is pretty much equal to "earlier" anyway
    P.S.: Of course, there is also "до" ("do") preposition ("to" as a limit of spatial movement, but "before" in the temporal meaning), which can render sentential "до того, как..." ("do tovó, kak..." - lit. "before that, as...").
     

    Dymn

    Senior Member
    "soon" : subitu / luego
    Interesting... an obvious loanword from Spanish. In Western Catalonia there's also alego for "soon" which comes from Spanish too, but the word is increasingly being replaced by aviat, in fact, I've never heard it in real life. Interestingly luego in Spanish no longer means "early" but "later". Portuguese on the other hand does retain logo as "later".

    I thought it strange, but I could imagine people in Dutch saying: 'Hij komt snel' he comes fast, whereas I would not deem it the best word... But of course someone who is fast can come soon, I suppose...
    There's certainly a link between "soon" and "fast/quick". In fact, in Majorca aviat can also mean "fast" (as an adverb, if I understand it correctly), and in both Catalonia and Majorca fer via means "to hurry up". Via means "way", obviously.
     

    Sardokan1.0

    Senior Member
    Sardu / Italianu
    In Western Catalonia there's also alego for "soon" which comes from Spanish too,
    It seems the simple preposition "a + luego", we often use it in Sardinian.

    For example, if I say "see you soon"

    I can say :

    - nos bidímus luego
    - nos bidímus a luego
    - a luego
     

    Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Pronto. Enseguida (alternative spelling en seguida) may work too.
    as soon as
    Tan pronto como.
    Temprano (both as an adjective and as an adverb). As an adverb, pronto can be used too.
    There's certainly a link between "soon" and "fast/quick".
    In Spanish, I see it too. As an adjective, pronto means speedy so you can easily relate it with other terms like rápido, raudo...
     

    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Greek:

    Early (adj.): «Πρώιμος, -μη, -μο» [ˈprɔ.i.mɔs] (masc.), [ˈprɔ.i.mi] (fem.), [ˈprɔ.i.mɔ] (neut.) < Classical adj. «πρώϊμος, -μος, -μον» prṓïmŏs (masc. & fem.), prṓïmŏn (neut.) --> early, premature < Classical adv. «πρωΐ» prōḯ (Attic «πρῴ» prǭ́) --> early in the morning, at morn, the forenoon (PIE *proH- early, in the morning cf Proto-Germanic *frōwaz > Ger. früh, Dt. vroeg).

    Early (adv.): «Νωρίς» [nɔˈɾis], aphetism of Byz. Gr. adverb «ἐνωρίς» enōrís (idem) < Koine adj. «ἔνωρος, -ος, -ον» énōrŏs (masc. & fem.), énōrŏn (neut.) --> early < Classical preposition & prefix «ἐν» ĕn + Classical fem. «ὥρᾱ» hṓrā.

    Soon: (A) «Σύντομα» [ˈsin.dɔ.ma] (adv.), adverbialised neuter plural of the Classical adj. «σύντομος, -μος, -μον» súntŏmŏs (masc. & fem.), súntŏmŏn (neut.) --> lit. cut short, metaph. concise, brief < Classical preposition & prefix «σύν» sún + Classical fem. noun «τομή» tŏmḗ.
    (B) «Γρήγορα» [ˈɣri.ɣɔ.ɾa] (adv.), adverbialised aphetism of perfect tense «ἐγρήγορα» ēgrḗgŏră of Koine v. «ἐγρηγορέω/ἐγρηγορῶ» ēgrēgŏréō (uncontracted)/ēgrēgŏrô (contracted) --> to awake, rouse, raise (PIE *h₁ger- to awake; the perf. «ἐγρήγορα» is parallel to Skt. जागर (jāgara), is awake, Av. jayāra (idem), Alb. ngre, to rise, from *h₁g(r)e-h₁gor-).
    (A) & (B) are used interchangeably nowadays, although in reality there are some subtle differences between the two.

    As soon as: (1) «Το συντομότερο» [tɔ sin.dɔˈmɔ.te.ɾɔ] --> the quicker/briefer ("possible" is omitted) («συντομώτερο» is the comparative of neut. «σύντομο»).
    (2) «Το γρηγορώτερο» [tɔ ɣri.ɣɔˈɾɔ.te.ɾɔ] --> the sooner/swifter ("possible" is omitted) (again, «γρηγορώτερο» is the comparative of the neut. adj. «γρήγορο»).
    (1) & (2) are used interchangeably.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    So no link between the adj. 'early' and the adv. We do have some variation as for the adv. (eerder, vroeger), but eerder is more often used in a figurative sense: rather, as in French plutôt (as opposed to plus tôt). Ik zou het eerder niet doen/ I'd rather not do it...

    I am a little surprised by the fact that you see to have two words for soon. Any difference? Any explanation for that? We do have binnenkort [with-short) and weldra, which could be considered synonyms (or almost) - and I now realize weldra is seldom used and is making way for binnenkort... (Yet, the zodra/as soon as "stands strong", which is logical, I suppose, because it is a useful conjunction…)
     
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    Armas

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    Finnish:

    (1) soon: pian, kohta
    as soon as: niin pian kuin ("so soon as"), heti kun ("right away when")
    as soon as possible: pikimmiten ("soonest-ly"), mahdollisimman pian ("most-possibly soon")
    sooner or later: ennemmin tai myöhemmin ("earlier or later")
    (2) early (adj.): varhainen, aikainen
    early (adv.): varhain, varhaisin, aikaisin
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Interesting to notice that Finnish considers asap a superlative. It is in some way of course, whereas we don't use it like that...

    Just BTWl: when comparing all the translations in (1) I don't see to recognize any common except for pian. Or am I mistaken? My knowledge of Finnish is of course 0.0001 % due to some words that I learnt by chance....
     
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