sored to death?

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tamermamer

Senior Member
Türkçe
Hello, in one of E.T.A Hoffman's books, I came across the following expression:

It seemed to me namely then, as if the nature built around us in a clavichord of thousand choirs, in whose strings we bustled around, holding her notes and chords and as if we would be sored to death, without knowing that the discordant struck note touched our wound.

I was wondering what sored to death mean and if possible, can 'sored' be replaced with another word?

Thank you...
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    This may be a poor translation. Or it is a 200-year-old translation. The first sentence has many errors.

    (cross-posted)
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello, in one of E.T.A Hoffman's books, I came across the following expression:

    It seemed to me namely then, as if the nature built around us in a clavichord of thousand choirs, in whose strings we bustled around, holding her notes and chords and as if we would be sored to death, without knowing that the discordant struck note touched our wound.

    I was wondering what sored to death mean and if possible, can 'sored' be replaced with another word?

    Thank you...
    The grammar of this sentence has many errors. I think that you may have transcribed it incorrectly.

    It seemed to me namely then, as if Nature built around us a clavichord of a thousand choirs, in whose strings we bustled around, holding her notes and chords and as if we would be sored to death, without knowing that the discordant struck note touched our wound.

    Although "sored to death" is very unusual, the meaning is clear. We are wounded and the discordant note aggravates this wound enough to kill us. It is a metaphor for something that has gone before.
     
    Last edited:

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    A strange translation, full of grammatical errors. Try this one.
    It appeared to me, at that time, that Nature has built all around us a thousand-stringed clavichord, in which we roam about, fancying the tones and chords produced are called forth by our own will, and that we are often mortally wounded, without guessing that an unharmoniously-struck tone has given us our death-blow.
    The Sanctus. A tale, by Hoffmann, translated from the German by Sabilla Novello
    The Musical Times March 1, 1863
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    A thousand-stringed clavichord makes much more sense than a thousand-choir one. A "choir" is a group of singers. A clavichord is an instrument similar to a piano, with many "strings".
     
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