Sorry, dass ich erst heute antworte

DesertCat

Senior Member
inglese | English
Can someone please translate this into English. It was in response to my inquiry on shipping an item to the US (from Berlin). While I'm able to ascertain the shipping amount I'm not sure what else the person is saying.

Soirry, dass ich erst heute antworte, ich war ein paar tage krank
- das Porto bis in die USA Luftpost kostet leider 12 euro - lieben
gruss aus berlin ute

Thanks, Alice
 
  • Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    DesertCat said:
    Can someone please translate this into English. It was in response to my inquiry on shipping an item to the US (from Berlin). While I'm able to ascertain the shipping amount I'm not sure what else the person is saying.

    Soirry, dass ich erst heute antworte, ich war ein paar tage krank
    - das Porto bis in die USA Luftpost kostet leider 12 euro - lieben
    gruss aus berlin ute

    Thanks, Alice
    Sorry for answering only today but I had been ill for a few days. I'm afraid (alternatively: Unfortunately), the postage for airmail to the US is 12 €.
    Best wishes from Berlin

    Ute (name of the lady who sent the e-mail or whatsoever to you)

    Hope I could help a bit.

    Ralf
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    "only to-day" is a word for word translation of erst heute but it is not what we say in English.

    In these cases "erst + time" means "not until + time".

    I'm sorry that I couldn't reply until to-day, but I was sick for a couple of days.

    erst + time usually means reworking the sentence.
    Du kannst erst mit 18 Jahren ein eigenes Handy haben.
    You can't have your own mobile/cell phone until you are 18.
     

    DesertCat

    Senior Member
    inglese | English
    Thanks a lot for the transaltion Ralf (and Brioche for your additional comment). I took German in high school (many years ago) but have forgotten most of it.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Brioche said:
    "only to-day" is a word for word translation of erst heute but it is not what we say in English.

    In these cases "erst + time" means "not until + time".

    I'm sorry that I couldn't reply until to-day, but I was sick for a couple of days.

    erst + time usually means reworking the sentence.
    Du kannst erst mit 18 Jahren ein eigenes Handy haben.
    You can't have your own mobile/cell phone until you are 18.
    I started to write a reply before work that said almost the same thing, but I was very tired and did not feel I could answer clearly. I agree with what you said totally.

    I think we do use "only" in some way that I can't quite remember at the moment though:

    You can only have your own mobile phone when you turn 18.

    AH! I think I've got it:

    Sorry, dass ich erst heute antworte, ich war ein paar tage krank

    "Sorry that I'm just now answering—I was (I've been) sick [for] a few/a couple days."

    I'll bet Ralf had that in mind and could not quite get the word order right. But he'll let us know. ;)

    Gaer
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    gaer said:
    ..
    Sorry, dass ich erst heute antworte, ich war ein paar tage krank

    "Sorry that I'm just now answering—I was (I've been) sick [for] a few/a couple days."

    I'll bet Ralf had that in mind and could not quite get the word order right. But he'll let us know. ;)

    Gaer
    Of course that is what I had in mind since it is actually what the German sentence says. The odd thing is that I've kept such a misleading phrase as "only today" in mind since my student days. I'm sure I had used it now and then (the last time yesterday) but nobody ever corrected me--until today. Thank you both, Gaer and Brioche.

    Ralf
     

    MrMagoo

    Senior Member
    Westphalia, Germany; German
    Brioche said:
    "only to-day" is a word for word translation of erst heute but it is not what we say in English.

    In these cases "erst + time" means "not until + time".

    I'm sorry that I couldn't reply until to-day, but I was sick for a couple of days.

    erst + time usually means reworking the sentence.
    Du kannst erst mit 18 Jahren ein eigenes Handy haben.
    You can't have your own mobile/cell phone until you are 18.

    Hello Brioche,

    interesting... I have a special friend in Northern Ireland who always writes to-day, to-night, to-morrow.... At school, I've learnt to spell it today, tomorrow, tonight, ... and most (maybe all) of my English speaking friends write it that way, too.
    Do you know where this hyphenated form comes from? Is it an older style of writing or just kind of 'habit' for a few people? ;)

    Best wishes
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    today, tomorrow, tonight are more modern.

    My older dictionary has to-day, today; to-morrow, tomorrow; to-night, tonight

    I had a look in my King James Bible.
    At Luke 23:42 it has "... To day shalt thou be with me in paradise."
    At Acts 23:15 it has " ... that he bring him down unto you to morrow"
    At Genesis 30:14 it has " ...he shall lie with thee to night"
    To words, not even a hyphen.

    My Compete Works of Shakespeare has
    Macbeth, Act 5, scene 5
    To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
    Creeps in this petty pace from day to day

    Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 1
    What, has this thing appear'd again to-night?

    Henry V, Act 4, Scene 3
    For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
    Shall be my brother;
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Brioche said:
    today, tomorrow, tonight are more modern.

    My older dictionary has to-day, today; to-morrow, tomorrow; to-night, tonight

    I had a look in my King James Bible.
    At Luke 23:42 it has "... To day shalt thou be with me in paradise."
    At Acts 23:15 it has " ... that he bring him down unto you to morrow"
    At Genesis 30:14 it has " ...he shall lie with thee to night"
    To words, not even a hyphen.

    My Compete Works of Shakespeare has
    Macbeth, Act 5, scene 5
    To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow,
    Creeps in this petty pace from day to day

    Hamlet, Act 1, Scene 1
    What, has this thing appear'd again to-night?

    Henry V, Act 4, Scene 3
    For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
    Shall be my brother;
    Is this older spelling (to-day) still used where you live? I have never seen it in modern texts.

    Gaer
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    gaer said:
    Is this older spelling (to-day) still used where you live? I have never seen it in modern texts.

    Gaer
    to-morrow, to-day and to-night are not very common, but they are certainly still used.

    My version of Word doesn't like to-day or to-night, but is happy with to-morrow.
     

    gaer

    Senior Member
    US-English
    Brioche said:
    to-morrow, to-day and to-night are not very common, but they are certainly still used.

    My version of Word doesn't like to-day or to-night, but is happy with to-morrow.
    Isn't that strange? My version accept only "to-morrow" also. :) If you say they are still used, I would not doubt you. I'm a very weak speller.

    Oh! A Google search brings up both "to-morrow" and "to morrow", but I see many instances of your spelling. It must be much more common than I thought. :)

    Gaer
     
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