'"Sorry to run your cat over" vs "sorry to have to run your cat over"'

babai

Senior Member
bangla, bangoli
I saw these sentences in a site. The site says "I am sorry to run your cat over" does not make sense and "I am sorry to have to run your cat over" makes sense. As I know "Sorry to do something is an appology for what I am going to say or do". then could you consider does the sentence make sense or not? If not then could you explain? the sentence is below:
"I am sorry to run your cat over"

Source: Be sorry for/to
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "I am sorry to run your cat over" makes no sense, but "I am sorry to have [to] run your cat over" isn't much better. I would say "I am sorry that I ran over your cat."
     

    babai

    Senior Member
    bangla, bangoli
    This means: "I am sorry that I am required to run your cat over."

    If this makes sense to you, please explain. :confused:
    No I don't understand. Could you explain?

    "I am sorry to run your cat over" makes no sense, but "I am sorry to have [to] run your cat over" isn't much better. I would say "I am sorry that I ran over your cat."
    If I want to say what I am going to do, This sentence would be meaningful "I am sorry that I have to run over your cat" > "I am sorry to have to run over your cat".? and tell me one more thing why does not the sentence make any sense? (I am sorry to run your cat over)
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    MarcB

    Senior Member
    US English
    I am sorry +past tense see post 2.= I did something I am sorry. The other sentences are wrong.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    A: I am sorry to have to run your cat over.
    B: Why do you have to run my cat over?
    A: Because I must. I have to do it. My boss has told me to.
    B: Oh well, if you must, you must.
    A: I'll try to make it quick, so Tiddles doesn't suffer too much.
    B: I've had him for 10 years. I'll miss him.
    A: Yeah. Me too.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    These two have different meanings:

    "I am sorry to have to run your cat over."
    "I am sorry to have run your cat over."

    The second one is what you need.
     
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