sorry to see you go

casburn

Senior Member
British, UK
Could someone please help me with:
"We'll be sorry to see you go" in the context of neighbours leaving the area.
Thanks
 
  • brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Hi, here's my try: Es wird uns Leid tun, dass ihr losgeht (losgehen werdet?).

    Not 100% on that, so wait for the natives. :)
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    @Frank: 1) why present tense? In English there is a difference between "We are sorry to see you go" and "We will be sorry to see you go." 2) why not losgehen? Or do you just prefer weggehen?

    In other words, is my translation really that bad? :D
     

    Derselbe

    Senior Member
    Deutsch, German, ドイツ語
    "losgehen" ist etwa wie "start going".

    Normalerweise sagst du etwa "Ich geh jetzt los, also komm ich etwa um 14 Uhr an." Mit dem Beispiel geht es darum, dass jemand die Nachbarschafft verläßt - also "weg" geht/zieht - nicht zielgerichtet zu einem anderen Ort losgeht.

    "Es ist schade, dass ihr geht." = Das Bedauern über das zukünftige Ereignis ist in der Gegenwart schon vorhanden, den die Entscheidung steht schon fest.
    "Es tut mir leid, dass ihr wegzieht." = Auch hier ist das Bedauern bereits in der Gegenwart vorhanden - selber Grund.
    Aber
    "Es wird mir leid tun, euch weggehen zu sehen." = Das Bedauern ist gebunden an der zukünftigen Situation, die dann wenn sie konkret eintritt als belastend empfunden werden wird.
     
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    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    @Frank: 1) why present tense? In English there is a difference between "We are sorry to see you go" and "We will be sorry to see you go." 2) why not losgehen? Or do you just prefer weggehen?

    In other words, is my translation really that bad? :D
    There are just 2 tenses (or better time periods) which are being distinguised STRICTLY in German. That´s "past" and "non-past". I´ve read that this goes back the the old Germanic tribes. They didn´t need more than those two.

    You can use the future here as well.
    "Es tut uns Leid, dass ihr wegziehen werdet"

    even "Es wird uns Leid tun, dass ihr wegziehen werdet" - but this is rather rare.

    losgehen= start going to a certain place (literally! - walking)
    Ich gehe jetzt mal los. - I´ll be on my way in a few moments.
    Wir machen uns jetzt los = Wir gehen/verlassen Euch jetzt, z.B. auf einer Geburtstagsfeier
     
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    Derselbe

    Senior Member
    Deutsch, German, ドイツ語
    There are just 2 tenses (or better time periods) which are being distinguised STRICTLY in German. That´s "past" and "non-past". I´ve read that this goes back the the old Germanic tribes. They didn´t need more than those two.
    Das wollte ich zuerst auch schreiben, aber ""Es tun mir leid, euch weggehen zu sehen." geht irgendwie nicht.
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Thanks to both of you for your explanations.

    That actually clarifies something for me. When I was living on a farm in Switzerland, one of the girls (a German) living there was leaving to go back to Germany. On the day she left, she came up to me to say good-bye and said, "Ich gehe los." -- or something similar, she used losgehen anyhow.

    I obviously mistook that to mean "I'm leaving now (for good)," when I suppose it actually meant "I'm getting ready to leave (for good) / I'll be leaving (for good) very soon." Right?
     

    Derselbe

    Senior Member
    Deutsch, German, ドイツ語
    Thanks to both of you for your explanations.

    That actually clarifies something for me. When I was living on a farm in Switzerland, one of the girls (a German) living there was leaving to go back to Germany. On the day she left, she came up to me to say good-bye and said, "Ich gehe los." -- or something similar, she used losgehen anyhow.

    I obviously mistook that to mean "I'm leaving now (for good)," when I suppose it actually meant "I'm getting ready to leave (for good) / I'll be leaving (for good) very soon." Right?
    It kind of makes sense from the perspective of the one who leaves - allthough not too much, if you ask me. But you could say that for the person who leaves, it feels like going somewhere - to a new place or something. So it's kind of pointed at something. But for the one who stays the important part is that someone is leaving - going away - no matter where he goes. "los" points at something which is of no interest for the one who stays
    However, I think she just wanted to point out that the time of departure had come. Something like "es geht los" "los geht's". I'd translate "ich gehe los" in that context with "I'm departing."
     

    Kuestenwache

    Senior Member
    German-Germany
    That would be my guess too. "losgehen" generally means "to start/to go off". In the context of a departure "es geht los" means the "jurney is about to begin", this can have a litteral or a metaphorical meaning:
    "My new life will start tomorrow"-"Morgen geht mein neues Leben los"
    "We will leave tomorrow around eight"-"Morgen so um acht geht es los"(litterally "tomorrow at about eight it will begin").

    In the first example you can see again that the future is expressed by using a present tense construction. As already pointed out this is quite common in German. Many dialect actually don't really form a future tense but use a present tense construction together with the context.
    "Wir fliegen morgen nach Amerika"-"We will fly to America tomorrow"
    "Wir fahren nächstes Jahr in den Urlaub"-"We will go on vacation next year".
     

    kloie

    Senior Member
    English
    That would be my guess too. "losgehen" generally means "to start/to go off". In the context of a departure "es geht los" means the "jurney is about to begin", this can have a litteral or a metaphorical meaning:
    "My new life will start tomorrow"-"Morgen geht mein neues Leben los"
    "We will leave tomorrow around eight"-"Morgen so um acht geht es los"(litterally "tomorrow at about eight it will begin").

    In the first example you can see again that the future is expressed by using a present tense construction. As already pointed out this is quite common in German. Many dialect actually don't really form a future tense but use a present tense construction together with the context.
    "Wir fliegen morgen nach Amerika"-"We will fly to America tomorrow"
    "Wir fahren nächstes Jahr in den Urlaub"-"We will go on vacation next year".
    You could use it like that in english too, I am flying to america tomorrow and so on.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    @Frank: 1) why present tense? In English there is a difference between "We are sorry to see you go" and "We will be sorry to see you go."
    I don't think this difference between English and German has something to do with being less STRINCT as Frank wrote.

    It is a difference in logic. In "We will be sorry to see you go." you use future tense because the people will be leaving in the future and not right now.

    In German using the Future tense in this sentence implies that the final word is not yet spoken whether or not the people leave. If you knew for sure that they leave tomorrow you would start feeling sorry already now. And this is why you have to use present tense: "Es tut [present] us Leid, dass ihr gehen werdet [future]". But on the other hand you say "Wir werden [future] traurig sein, wenn ihr weg seit [present].". This is a different kind of "being sorry" namely mourning a loss which starts after (the earlier event is in present) the loss has happened.
     
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