Sorry, we missed you

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Sélvia

New Member
italian
"Sorry, we missed you" è il messaggio lasciato dai corrieri quando il destinatario non è in casa. In italiano lo tradurrei come "Mi spiace, ma non La abbiamo trovata".
Mi chiedevo se, pensando alla trama dell'ultimo film di Ken Loach, possa essere inteso da un madreliangua anche come un gioco di parole ed essere percepito come: "ci spiace, ci sei mancato".
Grazie a tutti quelli che interverranno.
 
  • Starless74

    Senior Member
    Italiano
    Che we missed you significhi anche "ci sei mancato/ci siete mancati" è un dato di fatto;
    cosa abbia a che fare logicamente con una mancata consegna però mi sfugge, specie se preceduto da sorry. :confused:
    Forse dovrei guardarmi il film di Loach.
     
    Mi chiedevo se, pensando alla trama dell'ultimo film di Ken Loach, possa essere inteso da un madreliangua anche come un gioco di parole ed essere percepito come: "ci spiace, ci sei mancato".
    Anche in Italiano il verbo mancare ha lo stesso doppio significato che ha to miss in Inglese, ma la costruzione è decisamente diversa, sia in un senso:

    We missed you = Ti abbiamo mancato
    We missed you = Ci sei mancato

    che nell'altro:

    We missed you = Ci sei mancato
    You missed us = Ci hai mancato

    I due significati del verbo to miss mi sembrano talmente ugualmente comuni che mi sembra impossibile pensare ad un gioco di parole, in presenza di contesto. Caso mai si può verificare ambiguità in assenza di contesto.
     

    rrose17

    Senior Member
    Canada, English
    Mi chiedevo se, pensando alla trama dell'ultimo film di Ken Loach, possa essere inteso da un madreliangua anche come un gioco di parole ed essere percepito come: "ci spiace, ci sei mancato".
    Yes,there is an ambiguity that is understood here. To say "We missed you", by itself, in most contexts would be "ci sei mancato" but it has become very common in the missed delivery sense. The latter, with the "sorry", I'd say is is a much more modern usage. I think the Ken Loach film is also playing with this ambiguity.
     

    Einstein

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    I have yet to see the film, so I'm only guessing, but I think it follows a fairly common trend of naming a film with a chance phrase (e.g. "As good as it gets") that gives no idea of the content. So too with Loach: "Daniel Blake", "My name is Joe" and "The wind that shakes the barley". However, "Sorry we missed you" comes nearer to the content.
    In italiano comunicazioni di questo genere hanno un registro più burocratico
    Probably also in English in the past, but nowadays, with the privatisation of everything including the air we breathe and increasing exploitation, brutal labour relations have to be masked with an apparently friendly, informal language, "near to the people".

    On a strictly linguistic point, "Sorry we missed you" can be translated as "Ci dispiace non averti trovato" o "Ci dispiace se non ti abbiamo trovato." So no comma after "Sorry".
     
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    Sélvia

    New Member
    italian
    Thank you for your comments! Really appreciated and helpful, all of them.
    I think I'm going to use this forum more often in the future.
    By for now! : -)
     

    lentulax

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Mi chiedevo se, pensando alla trama dell'ultimo film di Ken Loach, possa essere inteso da un madreliangua anche come un gioco di parole ed essere percepito come: "ci spiace, ci sei mancato"
    Yes and no; if you have in mind the Loach film, that is ('Sorry we missed you' - no comma), I'm sure a wider suggestion in addition to the literal delivery-driver's message is intended. I haven't yet had the chance to see the film, but I know what its subject is (and I know something about that in real life, not by personal experience but by close-quarters observation and involvement); 'miss' has many meanings in English : to 'miss' something is , depending on context, not see it , or hear it or notice it or be aware of it, etc. and to me the general idea is that the film presents brutal facts about the lives of some people in the UK today which seem to have been overlooked by British society as a whole ('we'). Loach is trying to put that right; his film in a sense is an apology on behalf of British society.
     

    Sélvia

    New Member
    italian
    Yes and no; if you have in mind the Loach film, that is ('Sorry we missed you' - no comma), I'm sure a wider suggestion in addition to the literal delivery-driver's message is intended. I haven't yet had the chance to see the film, but I know what its subject is (and I know something about that in real life, not by personal experience but by close-quarters observation and involvement); 'miss' has many meanings in English : to 'miss' something is , depending on context, not see it , or hear it or notice it or be aware of it, etc. and to me the general idea is that the film presents brutal facts about the lives of some people in the UK today which seem to have been overlooked by British society as a whole ('we'). Loach is trying to put that right; his film in a sense is an apology on behalf of British society.
    Love your explanation lentulax. Thank you very much!
     
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