Sortie de cordon

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Le Pti Chinoa

New Member
French
Hi Guys,

In our technical jargon, we often call "sortie de cordon" the device or accordion-structure that limits the flexion of an electrical cord or wire (else it would break and burn). My fellow colleagues often translated it by "cord exit" which seems to me to be too much of a litteral translation.

The GRAND DICTIONNAIRE did not come up with anything and there was no thread on that phrase. But after checking a few webpages that do mention "cord exit" on some electrical devices, I came to beleive it is still the most accurate translation.

I'd like to have some "seniors"' opinion.

Cheers,

Ptit Chinoa
 
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  • broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I know exactly what you mean but I have no idea what its official name is in English. I never even realised what it was for until I saw your post. Thanks for educating me!

    I think you are right: it is extremely unlikely it would be called cord exit, especially in BE where we do not refer to wires or leads as 'cords'.

    You could refer to it as a 'flexible reinforcing sheath' but it would be best to have a picture so that people knew what you were talking about!

    Sorry I can't be of more help, but questions on this forum don't get much more specialised than this.
     

    Le Pti Chinoa

    New Member
    French
    Hi Broglet,

    To tell you the truth, "sortie de cordon" is probably not an official way of refering to the "thing" I am talking about, but it came to be the phrase (most) used in the industry for that as it just means "the thing/place where the cords comes/sticks out". If you Google it in French, hundreds of pages pop up and mention all kinds of devices with that element of structure.

    I never saw pictures attached in the threads I read, but that is indeed a good idea: so here is a picture (attached)

    While writing that reply, I kept Googling for related elements. Now I found the translation. The english phrase for "sortie de cordon" is: "Cord Guard"

    Thanks anyway,

    Le Pti Chinoa
     

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    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Well done. It is indeed a cord guard - I suspect this was originally an Americanism. I bet if you asked a dozen English people at random what they thought a cord guard was, none of them would get it!
     
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