Sour cabbage [cooked] with pork leg?

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Camlearner

Senior Member
Khmer
Hi

This is my Cambodian food/meal. I want to translate it for English speakers. What should I say?
I use sour cabbage (cabbage that has been put in lemon water for a month) plus the leg of pig.
Can I say the name of my food is Sour cabbage [cooked] with pork leg :confused:
Thanks
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hullo Cam. I'd call that leg of pork with soured cabbage. For me the pork would be the important part, but I think that in the names of dishes in general the meat comes first in English.
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Thanks ewie for your help.

    leg of pork with soured cabbage.

    Is it important that I need to put d after sour ? because sour can be adjective too? or sour and soured can mean differently?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Thanks ewie for your help.

    leg of pork with soured cabbage.

    Is it important that I need to put d after sour ? because sour can be adjective too? or sour and soured can mean differently?
    I prefer "soured" in this context. That may be to avoid giving the impression that the cabbage itself is sour.
    Looking around, I wonder if you might be better to refer to this as "pickled cabbage" - see for example http://projects.washingtonpost.com/recipes/2011/08/10/cambodian-style-cabbage-pickle/.
     

    Biffo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Sauerkraut is an adopted word in English as far as I know. That translates directly as sour(ed) cabbage.

    Sauerkraut directly translated: "sour cabbage", is finely shredded cabbage that has been fermented by various lactic acid bacteria
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauerkraut

    I don't know if is valid to include cabbage that has been put in lemon water in the above classification. The problem is that many people when reading 'sour(ed) cabbage' will automatically default to thinking it is sauerkraut or perhaps coleslaw.

    Maybe you could call it lemon-soured-cabbage as it is unfamiliar to many of us.

    It is just a suggestion and I am interested to see what others say.

    EDITED to make more sense
     
    Last edited:

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Sauerkraut is an adopted word in English as far as I know. That translates directly as sour(ed) cabbage.

    Sauerkraut
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sauerkraut
    I was going to mention that, but I suspect (with no real basis for the suspicion) that the Cambodian version is quite different from the Polish version.
    From the Wiki reference, sauerkraut - "keeps for several months in an airtight container stored at or below 15 °C (60 °F). Neither refrigeration nor pasteurization is required, although these treatments prolong storage life."

    That, and it would surely be a bit incongruous to find sauerkraut on a Cambodian menu :)
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    The brine used to make sauerkraut has a a fair amount of salt in it, which it sounds different from the Cambodian soured cabbage. So on a Cambodian menu the word sauerkraut might be inaccurate as well as incongruous. I would enjoy seeing it because I have an odd sense of humor, but few people want to make "Amusing people with weird senses of humor" one of the goals of their menus. ;)
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I'd call it pork with pickled cabbage. Pickling doesn't imply a particular method of souring, as far as I know, though it usually involves salt and/or an acid like vinegar or lemon. Edit: to me, sauerkraut and Korean kimchi are both varieties of pickled cabbage.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Was the pork cooked with the cabbage? (The title suggests that might be what happened but the discussion is unclear). If they were prepared separately and presented together on the plate to eat, then the word cooked should be omitted from (or moved in) the wording in the thread title. Pickled (or another word) cabbage with pork.

    In many situations, the word for the dish used in the native language of the cuisine where it originated is brought into English and not translated. Hence names in English like sauerkraut and kimchee :)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Here's another vote for 'pickled cabbage', or if necessary 'Cambodian pickled cabbage'.

    I'm just wondering whether this is what it's like?
     

    Camlearner

    Senior Member
    Khmer
    Thank you everyone for your help.

    Hi JulianStuart, yes the pork is cooked with soured cabbage.

    Hi natkretep, yes it looks similar. :)
     
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