Space between $ dollar sign and amount

Terrorizer

Senior Member
Polish
Hello,
According to the information found on Internet, there should be no space between dollar sign and amount e.g. $1000.
Seems alright as long as the amount is in the above format.
It starts looking awful, when the amount is written more precisely like this: $9312.1234 (it would look much better $ 9312.1234).
Is it really such a big deal? Is it just a grammatical thing or it is something I shouldn't do my own way?
Thank you and best wishes
 
  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    That is correct. I don't understand why you say the space makes it look better. In English, put the currency symbol before the number with no space. For your example, put in a comma separator for the thousand.

    $9,312.1234
    £3,286
    €2,986
    ¥1,000,000
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There can only be two digits to the right of the decimal point, so $9312.1234 :cross: $9,312.12 :tick:

    Yes, it's always written like this, with no space between the $ sign and the digits.

    It's the same with the British pound sign: £1,234.56.

    Cross-posted.
     

    Terrorizer

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Thank you for your replies :)

    In case of big markets or currency exchanges, there are dozens of these numbers with currency sign at the beginning.
    It looks good as long as you have just few of them. When you have all screen in these, it starts getting really unreadable.

    The 4 digits after decimal point make the amount more precise. In case of crypto-currencies for example it makes a big difference and is even necessary.
     

    Parliament

    Member
    English (UK) & Dutch (NL)
    These matters are standardised, so there isn't much room to "do things your own way". There should not be a space after the symbol.

    Also, be mindful of the use of commas and periods. Some (European) countries reverse them. For example:

    $123,456.01 :tick: Proper in UK/US English
    $123.456,01 :cross: Wrong in UK/US English (but correct in Dutch, for example!)
     

    Parliament

    Member
    English (UK) & Dutch (NL)
    OK. I know nothing about crypto-currencies, but in the real world, dollars have 100 cents and pounds have 100 pennies, and so we only need two digits after the point.
    Concerning cypto-currencies, there might be a great number of digits, as it often concerns very small fractions (as one unit or 'coin' may be valued at thousands of dollars).

    Then again, these matters are extraordinarily recent, and style guides (or users of language, for that matter) have yet to agree on the standards. For example, BitCoin (although having an official symbol: ₿) generally has the number suffixed by BTC instead of prefixed by the symbol.

    Concerning non-crypto currencies, employ the two-digit rule and the other established standards. For crypto-currencies, the standards are still subject to change. Refer to recent articles on the matter for the general consensus if needed.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    If more clarity is really needed, amounts would be tabulated, and lined up on the decimal points, and there would either be no currency symbol (if they were all the same) or the ISO codes would be used, in front of possibly many spaces before the leading digit.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Displaying a whole column of currencies in a chart at an exchange might have its own rules and conventions. But when writing monetary amounts in standard sentences, the rules above are the ones to follow.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    I just want to confirm that:

    -- GBP (£) and USD ($) prices in shops etc show either two digits after the decimal point or none;

    --- in some other contexts, several digits after the decimal point may be used, and not only with crypto-currencies.
    Any visit to a forex site or bureau de change would confirm that.
     
    Last edited:

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ... it would look much better $ 9312.1234).
    It would look better, or at least more natural, to someone in whose native language a space is used there and who has therefore grown up expecting to see a space. It would look worse to someone in whose native language a space is not used there and who has therefore grown up expecting to see no space. In English, a space is not used there. It's that simple. If you are writing in English, do not use a space. If that looks strange to you because there is a space in Polish, you will have to accept that. I can assure you that a space there looks just as strange to native English speakers.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Someone might think there is a typo and a number is accidentally missing. Maybe it was supposed to be $19312.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The only time I leave a space is when I am making a list of numbers.

    $ 1.46
    $ 5.92
    $ 14.65
    $ 26.22
    $100.00
    $120.00
    _________
    $268.25 (Total)

    Note: This forum does not allow extra spaces. In the composing area all the decimals line up vertically. That alignment disappears when I save the post.
     

    tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    For extra spaces, use as many dots as you need. Then change the text color to white. The dots become invisible, but they are still there. The spacing is not perfect, but it's better than nothing.Here's an example:

    $ ...1.46
    $ ...5.92
    $ .14.65
    $ ,26.22
    $100.00
    $120.00
    _________
    $268.25
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The only time I leave a space is when I am making a list of numbers.

    $ 1.46
    $ 5.92 ...
    Excel, as sold in the U.S., has two formats for financial amounts: "currency" format, in which the currency symbols is immediately before the numbers, and "accounting" format, in which the currency symbol is at the left side of the cell. It is quite easy to create a custom format in which the currency symbol is followed by a space, then the amount. Perhaps that is the default currency format in Excel as sold in countries where a space is normally used between the symbol and the number.

    Regarding the hint in the previous post: good idea, but don't use dots. Use digits. Dots don't have the same width as digits and vary from font to font, so you can't be sure they'll line up in the font that a given person uses even if they look great on your screen. All digits have the same width in most fonts.
     

    SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    If you insist on using a space between the currency and the amount, make sure it's a non-breaking space.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    If you insist on using a space between the currency and the amount...
    Which, if you are writing in English, you should NOT do. (That said, if you do it anyhow, knowing that you are making a mistake in usage, this is an excellent suggestion. It will keep you from getting a currency symbol by itself at the end of one line, and a number with no indication of its meaning at the start of the next.)
     
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