spadającymi z nóg trepami

zzjing

Member
Chinese - Mandarin
Sartorius patrzał na mnie badawczo, wciąż w jednakiej pozie, Snaut, odwrócony do niego plecami, krzątał się przy aparacie, umyślnie jak gdyby człapiąc spadającymi z nóg trepami.​

New English translation:

Sartorius was gazing at me inquiringly, still in the same pose; Snaut, his back to the other man, was busy with the equipment, seemingly deliberately clattering the clogs he wore loosely on his feet.​

The choice of the word "clogs" is interesting. Are clogs really a common thing? Should it be in this story? According to the PWN, "trep" could also mean "old, worn shoe".

I also find the expression "spadającymi z nóg" interesting.

For comparison, the old translation:

Sartorius had not budged from his previous position, and was looking at me. Snow had his back turned to operate the control-panel. I had the impression that he was amusing himself by making his sandals slap on the floor.​
 
  • zaffy

    Senior Member
    Polish
    For me, 'trepy' are heavy mountain boots. However, in everyday language we can use it as a pejorative slang word for any heavy, ugly shoes. If you leave your shoes in the way or in any place that I don't like, I might tell you angrily "Weź te trepy!" These could also be shoes with wooden soles like those that doctors wear here in Poland.

    Look at this list:
    https://krzyzowka.net/haslo-do-krzyzowki/trepy
     
    Last edited:

    Ben Jamin

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Sartorius patrzał na mnie badawczo, wciąż w jednakiej pozie, Snaut, odwrócony do niego plecami, krzątał się przy aparacie, umyślnie jak gdyby człapiąc spadającymi z nóg trepami.​

    New English translation:

    Sartorius was gazing at me inquiringly, still in the same pose; Snaut, his back to the other man, was busy with the equipment, seemingly deliberately clattering the clogs he wore loosely on his feet.​

    The choice of the word "clogs" is interesting. Are clogs really a common thing? Should it be in this story? According to the PWN, "trep" could also mean "old, worn shoe".

    I also find the expression "spadającymi z nóg" interesting.

    For comparison, the old translation:

    Sartorius had not budged from his previous position, and was looking at me. Snow had his back turned to operate the control-panel. I had the impression that he was amusing himself by making his sandals slap on the floor.​
    To answer this question it is necessary to know the Polish language of the time Lem wrote the book (1961). No knowledge of modern slang can help here. The word is indeed a slang word, and has had many different connotations. Originally it meant just clogs, but later it just became to be used as a derogatory name for shoes. In the 1970 it even was used as slur for a professional non commissioned officer of the army.
    Back to the question. It is probable that Lem thought about clogs here (especially as he liked to use words of older type). It can also mean any loose shoes without the heelcap (be back part of the shoes). For the translation "clogs" can function well, as it is not necessary for the plot to be so precise.
     
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