Spaniard student vs Spanish student (a student from Spain)

kwagna33

Senior Member
English - United States of America
Hello all!

I am trying to say the following in an essay:

"He helped a lot of students from Spain with learning English."

To make it less wordy (due to a wordcount), I am stuck between the following two options:

1. "He helped a lot of Spaniard students with learning English."
2. "He helped a lot of Spanish students with learning English."

Which is correct? Also, if the answer is "Spaniard," should it be capitalized?

Thank you everyone for your feedback!
 
  • elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Definitely "Spanish students," although this is ambiguous as it could mean "students of Spanish."

    To avoid the ambiguity without going over your word count limit, you could say "He helped many students from Spain..." That's actually one word shorter than your shorter version. ;)

    "Spaniard students" sounds strange.
     

    kwagna33

    Senior Member
    English - United States of America
    Thanks, elroy and RedwoodGrove for your helpful comments! I look forward to see if anyone else has further input.
     

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Spaniard is a noun, not an adjective, so it is incorrect to say or write "Spaniard student."

    I also would not use "with learning English" after "helped."
    Instead, I would say he helped them (to) learn English.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, Spaniard is a noun. You want an adjective before students. That is why we would say Spanish students. (And yes, in English we capitalise adjectives derived from proper nouns.)
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Agreed. Or, He helped many Spaniards learn English.
    :tick: - though in practice, I seldom use the noun "Spaniard" myself. I'd probably go for He helped many Spanish students [to] learn English.
    Though this is not 100% clear as to Spain, it's good and concise.
    What do you mean, Benny? Does "Spaniard" not unequivocally mean "person from Spain" to you?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Spaniards' sounds so 16th century to me. The only meaning I'm aware of is a person from Spain, although there's a breed of dog called 'spaniel'. Apart from the spaniels that are dogs, every other word to do with Spain starts with a capital letter.
    It is quite clear in this context that you help Spanish students learn English; any ambiguity would be theoretical.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I seldom use the noun "Spaniard" myself. I'd probably go for He helped many Spanish students [to] learn English.
    Not only is "Spaniard" a seldom used word, but "Spanish students" is clearer. "Spaniards" could be farmers, electricians, or chiropractors - not necessarily students.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top