Speedy recovery

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Oros

Senior Member
Korean


I am training 3 times a week at a gym. I got a swollen ankle due to over training. I may have train more than I should on the thread mill. I like the threadmill because it is good for my cardiovascular system.

A doctor gave me a cream to apply on the skin.

I have to take medicine for 14 days. However, I took it for more than 6 weeks on the hope of speedy recovery. I still have a minor pain.
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Is it correct to say 'on the hope of speedy recovery'?
 
  • mary de la loma

    Banned
    USA
    English
    I am training 3 times a week at a gym. I got a swollen ankle due to overtraining. I may have trained more than I should on the treadmill/(or) tread mill. I like the treadmill because it is good for my cardiovascular system.

    A doctor gave me a cream to apply on the skin.

    I also had to take medicine orally for 14 days. However, I took it for more than 6 weeks with the hope of a speedy recovery. I still have a minor pain.
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    Is it correct to say 'on the hope of speedy recovery'?
    We can also say 'with the hope of a speedy recovery.'

    With verbs like depend, give up, rely and build, however, yes, we can use the preposition 'on' in this expression.

     

    Oros

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thanks Mary

    It was not oral medicine. It was a cream to apply on the skin.
    You can keep hope on something.

    For example, you keep hope on becoming rich like Bill Gates.

    What is wrong with using 'on the hope' here?

    [It should be treadmill not threadmill. I didn't think so deep. It was an error.]
     

    mary de la loma

    Banned
    USA
    English
    I'm sorry. The use of "take medicine" leads us to believe that it is a separate medication taken orally. With salves, ointments and lotions, we would use the verbs use, apply (which you already know), put on or rub on.

    We can keep or place hope on or in the idea of something, but it would sound a little bit unusual to say that "I used medication on the hope of something." I think that when we use the word "on," the verb is directly linked with the "hope."

     

    Cayuga

    Senior Member
    English/USA

    You can keep hope on something.

    For example, you keep hope on becoming rich like Bill Gates.
    Actually, Oros, I would say, "I still hope to become as rich as Bill Gates."

    I can't think of an instance in which I would use "hope on."

    "hope to"
    "hopes to"
    "hope for"
    "hopes for"
    "in hope of"

    That's all I can think of.
     
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