Spend time at home relaxing

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alex_ln

Senior Member
Polish
Hello

Could you please let me know which one is correct?

A)I prefer to spend my time at home relaxing.

B)I prefer to spend my time at home to relax.

C)I prefer to spend my time at home and relax.

My opinion:All are correct.

Thanks
 
  • Crockett

    Senior Member
    US English
    Well, I like 'A' the best. 'B' is wrong. 'C' could be right- but if you're trying to say you relax when you are home, I would use 'A' because 'C' gives the impression that you prefer to spend your time doing two different things: relaxing and being at home. I hope that makes sense.
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    If I use "stay at home" instead of "spend my time at home" again you go for "A":

    A)I prefer to stay at home relaxing.

    B)I prefer to stay at home to relax.

    C)I prefer to stay at home and relax.

    Thank you for your quick reply :)
     

    alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I would appreciate it if others give their opinions about the following sentences as well:
    A)I prefer to stay at home relaxing.

    B)I prefer to stay at home to relax.

    C)I prefer to stay at home and relax.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    A)
    Q: "Do you play football?"
    A: "No, I prefer to stay at home relaxing.":tick:

    B)
    X: "Come down to the beach and relax!"
    A: "No, I prefer to stay at home to relax.:tick:

    C)
    Q: "Would you like to come and play football this afternoon?
    A: "No, I prefer to stay at home and relax. :tick:
     

    EnLearner

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Nice examples. I guess we can also say: X: "Come down to the beach and relax!"
    A: "No, I prefer to spend time at home to relax"

    Cant we?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    You will note that Enlearner gave no context, so I imagined a context in which it would work.

    B: "I spend my time at home running up and down stairs to keep fit. Do you do that?"
    A: "No, I prefer to spend time at home to relax" -> to = in order to
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Taraa, I don't think I could say what A said as a reply to what X said (#7).

    However, the sentence produced by A would work in some contexts. As Paul says (#9), the 'to relax' means 'in order to relax'.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    You will note that Enlearner gave no context, so I imagined a context in which it would work.

    B: "I spend my time at home running up and down stairs to keep fit. Do you do that?"
    A: "No, I prefer to spend time at home to relax" -> to = in order to
    Sorry I'm confused. Why is infinitive incorrect in the below sentence?
    "He spent time in England to learn English fluently.",
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Taraa, I don't think I could say what A said as a reply to what X said (#7).

    However, the sentence produced by A would work in some contexts. As Paul says (#9), the 'to relax' means 'in order to relax'.
    Im'm confused with the thread that I asked you and owlman yesterday. Why can't "to" in the below mean "in order to" and the sentence be correct?
    "He spent time in England to learn English fluently.",
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Sorry I'm confused. Why is the infinitive incorrect in the sentence below?
    "He spent time in England to learn English fluently.",
    Who said it was?

    You will note that I complained about a lack of context in #10, and now you have given no context.

    It is impossible to overstate how important context is in English.

    Because this is the case, we need to know that has been said before "He spent time in England to learn English fluently." [in order] to judge it.
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Who said it was?

    You will note that I complained about a lack of context in #10, and now you have given no context.

    It is impossible to overstate how important context is in English.

    Because this is the case, we need to know that has been said before "He spent time in England to learn English fluently." [in order] to judge it.
    No, to learn English like use here that are learning English to speak. Why did you said "to judge it", please?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I didn't find this sentence in the thread you linked to:

    He spent time in England to learn English fluently
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I didn't find this sentence in the thread you linked to:

    He spent time in England to learn English fluently
    Oh sorry Velisarius. I deleted the word "enough" my self. Youe sentence is:
    He spent enough time in England to learn English fluently
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Im'm confused with the thread that I asked you and owlman yesterday. Why can't "to" in the below mean "in order to" and the sentence be correct?
    "He spent time in England to learn English fluently.",
    Taraa, it's a question of logic. Spending time in England would not guarantee that he went home speaking English fluently, so the 'to' can't mean 'in order to'. Just 'He spent some time in England to learn English' makes more sense because it doesn't talk about an outcome that couldn't be guaranteed.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Spending time in England would not guarantee that he went home speaking English fluently,
    I suspect that if you spend some time in England, you will always learn some English - no matter how little. "To learn English" does not necessarily mean "to learn all of the English language."
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I suspect that if you spend some time in England, you will always learn some English - no matter how little. "To learn English" does not necessarily mean "to learn all of the English language."
    Precisely, Paul. That's whay I say, in #20, that 'He spent some time in England to learn English' makes more sense than 'He spent some time in England to learn English fluently.'
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Thank you both so much!
    So if I omit "fluently" it's correct and "to" mean "in order to":
    He spent time in England to learn English
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    My apologies, I misread: I was concentrating of the infinitive rather than the adverb that need not be there, and which has, as you point out, confused matters.
     
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