Spike peak

Jignesh77

Senior Member
India- hindi
I am reading an old article in the Metro UK regarding a heat wave last year. The bold headline is - 999 calls spike peak but relief

what part of speech is "spike peak" ?

is "relief" a noun?

thanks
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I can't make sense of that. '999 calls' is a noun phrase: phone calls to the emergency number. They peak (verb): that is, they are reaching a peak. Or they spike (verb): that is, they shoot up in a spike. Such a spike is of course probably a peak also. But I can't see how there can be a peak of a spike: with '999 calls spike' a noun phrase (a spike in 999 calls) peaking (its verb). I don't understand how 'spike' and 'peak' work together.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I wonder if the headline spread across onto the right hand page, and it should read "999 calls spike [...] peak but relief [...]". I might possibly come up with some explanation for "spike peak", but I cannot think of any explanation for "but relief", if nothing else follows.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I'm thinking that someone wrote "peak" then decided "spike" then forgot to delete "peak" – or vice versa. A normal headline might read:

    999 calls spike
    but relief soon


    However, here's the online source of the Metro UK article – and there's no relief in sight:

    London 999 calls double on hottest day of the year

    London paramedics have received double the number of average 999 calls per hour – because of the warm weather.

    Saturday was the sixth busiest day ever for emergency calls to reports of incidents that were immediately life-threatening, said Jason Killens, director of operations at London Ambulance.

    At its peak the service took 403 calls an hour – double what it would normally receive.
     
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