Spike the football

sergiofreeman

Senior Member
Spanish
Hi There!Obama said about the fact that Bin Laden is d111ceath already:I think Americans and people around the world are glad that he is gone. But we don't need to spike the football.”To spike the football would be the same as Brag about, I question. Thanks in advance.
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The dictionary is always a good place to look first :D:D
    From the WR dictionary definition of spike
    • 6 (in volleyball) hit (the ball) forcefully from a position near the net so that it moves downward into the opposite court. ■ American Football fling (the ball) forcefully to the ground, typically in celebration of a touchdown or victory.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    "Celebrating a victory" could be considered "bragging" but I don't know if the converse is always true - you can brag about other things, I think. The key for "spiking the football" is that it is done in front of the "losers", while bragging does not have that restriction in meaning. Also, "spiking the football" is now considered "unsportsmanlike" in American Football and incurs a penalty.
     

    quillerbee

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    The context Obama's quote was his decision not to release the photos of the deceased bin Laden. Therefore, spiking the football is a metaphor not for bragging but for a provocative action. Just like in football, everbody knows what happened, there is no need to cause further insult. I think is a great turn of phrase and a wise decision. Hats off to Obama.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    It just "wouldn't be cricket" to spike the football - it's simply unsportsmanlike to provoke someone by rubbing their nose in their own misfortune/loss.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    It just "wouldn't be cricket" to spike the football
    The WordReference dictionary lists one meaning of "cricket" which is a sport. It lists another meaning "fair play; honorable conduct" which is the meaning in this sentence. But it lists that meaning as a noun.

    So the sentence says spiking the football would not be fair play (honorable conduct).
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The WordReference dictionary lists one meaning of "cricket" which is a sport. It lists another meaning "fair play; honorable conduct" which is the meaning in this sentence. But it lists that meaning as a noun.

    So the sentence says spiking the football would not be fair play (honorable conduct).
    The "fair play, honorable conduct" meaning is derived directly from how one plays cricket:) (Or how one was supposed to, in the olden days :))

    Edited to add: From the wikipedia article on unsportsmanlike conduct ( :eek: )
    Since good behaviour in cricket is traditionally deemed the sine qua non of a gentleman to the game's historical status as a "gentleman's game", it has led to the saying, "It's not cricket", an English language phrase meaning unsportsmanlike conduct in sports, in business, or in life in general.
     
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