spirited a gun

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NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
Does "spirited a gun" refer to "carried secretly a gun"?

Thanks in advance

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A churchgoing Army veteran and father of four who lovingly penned his mother’s obituary two months ago apparently “snapped” yesterday when he spirited a gun into Brigham and Women’s Hospital and fatally shot the heart surgeon who had operated on her, according to the suspect’s sister.

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  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    It's spirited a gun into . . .; it's always used with 'into' (or 'through' or the like). Yes, somehow got it secretly into; as if it was insubstantial, like a spirit (ghost). Not specifically 'carried'; in fact 'spirited into' is a bit mysterious about how it was done.
     

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    It sounds that the hospital forbids carrying guns into it and the man like a ghost spirited it into the hospital?
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    This use of the verb "spirit" is defined in our dictionary. I've often come across things being spirited away; "spiriting things into places" is probably less usual:

    (Random House)
    to carry off mysteriously or secretly:
    They disguised the king and spirited him out a back door; spirited away by kidnappers.

    (Collins Concise)

    to carry off mysteriously or secretly (often fol. by away or off):
    His captors spirited him away.
     
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