spoke about the breakaway territories

SuprunP

Senior Member
Ukrainian & Russian
Yet when Russia’s foreign minister recently spoke about the breakaway territories in eastern Ukraine remaining within Kiev’s rule, he also suggested that Russia might base part of its nuclear arsenal in annexed Crimea.
(Merry Christmas, Mr. Putin; businessweek.com)

Would you be so kind as to tell me whether it should be read as 'he spoke about the prospects of the breakaway territories remaining within Kyiv's rule', but if not, could you explain to me whether some country's breakaway territories (by definition) can remain within that country's rule?

Thanks.
 
  • jmichaelm

    Senior Member
    English - US
    As written there is a slight ambiguity in the wording. It might be read as, "the prospect of the territories remaining within Kiev's rule" or instead as, "the territories in eastern Ukraine which remain under Kiev's rule." Since they are "breakaway territories" I think the former meaning, i.e. your first suggestion, must be correct.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    could you explain to me whether some country's breakaway territories (by definition) can remain within that country's rule?
    There is a de facto definition and a diplomatic definition.

    Once a territory has 'broken away', de facto, it is no longer under the rule of its parent government.

    However, the political perspective might be that although the territory has said that it is no longer part of the parent government, other countries would still see that territory as under the (at least, theoretical) rule of the parent government.

    A case in point was the former East Germany. The West did not recognise as legitimate the government of the territory calling itself "DDR" and considered that laws passed by the true German government (i.e. the government in Bonn - FDR) also applied in the DDR.

    This contrasts with Kosovo that the British goverment accepts as an independent state but Serbia, the parent country, does not.
     
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