Sponsorship/sponsoring

< Previous | Next >

G.Determinism

Senior Member
Persian
Hi there,

Which one would you think is correct in the following sentence?

"I am writing this letter to request your prestigious company to consider sponsorship/sponsoring of our mission."


Thanks
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    General rule:

    If you have two options, as here, between <abstract noun> + "of" + <object> and <present participle> + <direct object>, choose the second. You use a robust verb and it doesn't need "of".

    "I am writing this letter to request your prestigious company to consider sponsoring our mission."

    So much simpler!
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    No, I meant what I said.

    The present participle is what we call it in England. You may, if you wish, try to divide its usages into gerund, gerundive, verbal participle or whatever. I mostly find that exercise pointless and prefer to distinguish between nouns and verbs.

    So the question here becomes, which is it better to use:
    1. noun + "of" + noun (e.g. the sponsorship of our mission... the sponsoring of our mission...) ?
    2. verb + noun (e.g. sponsoring our mission)?
    My answer is that, for reasons of economy, style and simplicity, number 2 is usually preferable to number 1.
     

    277

    New Member
    Korean
    "I am writing this letter to request your prestigious company to consider sponsoring our mission."
    So much simpler!
    Thank you for your kind reply.
    It comes to me as a surprise that you consider it pointless to distinguish between the present participle and the gerund.
    (I hope I understood your point right.)

    The -ing forms | English Grammar | EF

    The link above says what I have understood about this particular subject so far.
    Still, I want to hear and learn more from you, and I hope this does not bother you.

    Thank you in advance.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    There are some grammar terms that English people very very rarely use, like gerund, aorist and preterite. These occur once in every three million printed words. The vast majority of native English speakers have no idea what they mean.

    And yet we manage to use words that end in -ing in all the ways your book describes; we just do it, without having a name for it. We can even use verbs, nouns and adjectives without necessarily knowing those technical terms!

    The way I understand it is that the present-participle form (words in -ing) can be nouns, adjectives or verbs. That's quite enough, thank you.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top