spox

Cagey

post mod (English Only / Latin)
English - US
Term: (A word or expression you have seen in writing)
spox
Your definition or explanation:
spox noun. An abbreviated form of spokesman seen in written news and political commentary.
(I don't know whether it is heard on broadcast media.)
Example: (An example of the term in use)
UPDATE: Schneiderman campaign spox James Freedland just sent out the following statement. “For NY1 to call this a 'hit and run' is nothing short of ... AG Hopeful Eric Schneiderman Involved In Hit-And-Run: NY1 New York Daily News (blog) - Celeste Katz - Jul 13, 2010
One or more places you have seen the term: (Please give URLs/links to web pages, or a full description of a print publication.)
"I see no reason why Carolyn Maloney continues to ignore Reshma's offer to debate unless she has something to hide," said Saujani spox James Allen. "After years of running virtually unopposed, a public debate is long ... (Jun 14, 2010 by Celeste Katz)http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/dailypolitics/ -
It is understandably popular in headlines.
Greek Sept. 16 election to be held as planned -spox
[ .... ]
"(Elections will be held) absolutely on schedule," said government spokesman Theodore Roussopoulos. (Reuters AlertNet - Aug 27, 2007)
[According to the Google news time-line, it suddenly became popular in 2007, apparently not existing before that year.]
Have you looked for this term or meaning in dictionaries, and not found it? Yes __:tick:__
No ___
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    It may be. That would be clever.

    When I read it, I assume that it is said as "spokes", not to rhyme with "fox", but I don't know. I don't remember ever having heard someone say 'spokes/spox' for 'spokesman'.

    That is, I understand the spelling as a purely visual play with an abbreviation. It may well be motivated by an association with vox, as you suggest.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    It may be. That would be clever.

    When I read it, I assume that it is said as "spokes", not to rhyme with "fox", but I don't know. I don't remember ever having heard someone say 'spokes/spox' for 'spokesman'.

    That is, I understand the spelling as a purely visual play with an abbreviation. It may well be motivated by an association with vox, as you suggest.
    Ah - it didn't occur to me it might be pronounced "spokes" - in my head I've been reading it as in "Spock's ears are big".
     
    Last edited:

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    On first sight I read it as "spocks". It was only when I got to the definition that I re-read it as "spokes". It is a very ugly word.
     
    Top