Spree

ainjibi

New Member
usa, english
Can anyone please help me with the word "spree" ? 1)I know it is a noun but are their other parts of speech applications -e.g. verb etc of the word? 2)I have plenty of synonyms for it but not a single antonym. I would appreciate if anyone has some antonyms for "spree" .3) Any suggestions of related words - would 'shopping" be a related word ?

Thanks
 
  • Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Spree is only a noun.

    The Liberal Media said:
    "Spree's" meaning can be conveyed as an action through the verb phrase "to go on a spree."
    Also, you can use the verb phrase "to be on a spree".
    Example: You are on a killing spree.
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Spree is defined as a verb in our own Wordreference.com but I am skeptical. My dictionary (American Heritage) shows it only as a noun and I have only heard it used as a noun, never a verb. I suppose it sounds ok to say, "I am going to spree today because it is my birthday". But not really :( .

    I have only heard the ones the others have given plus:

    A spending spree
    A drunken spree
    A shopping spree


    Antonyms??? I have no idea. Just stay home and do nothing! :)
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    ainjibi said:
    Can anyone please help me with the word "spree" ? 1)I know it is a noun but are their other parts of speech applications -e.g. verb etc of the word? 2)I have plenty of synonyms for it but not a single antonym. I would appreciate if anyone has some antonyms for "spree" .3) Any suggestions of related words - would 'shopping" be a related word ?

    Thanks
    The NEW OXFORD Dictionary
    OF ENGLISH


    :arrow: spree
    :arrow: noun a spell or sustained period of unrestrained activity of a particular kind: he went on a six-month crime spree | a shopping spree.
    a spell of unrestrained drinking.

    :arrow: verb (sprees, spreed, spreeing) [no OBJ.] dated take part in a spree.

    spend (money) recklessly: it was his custom to spree his money in a single night.

    PHRASES

    on the spree dated engaged in a spell of unrestrained drinking.

    ORIGIN late 18th cent: of unknown origin.


    spree: burst of indulging in something


    I went on a drinking/shopping/spending spree on Saturday.

    Twenty people were shot dead in the city making it the worst killing spree since the riots.
     

    The Liberal Media

    New Member
    Virginia, USA; English
    One would probably want to avoid using "spree" as a verb, though it technically would stand correctly and be understood, regardless. It's not exactly a commonly accepted/utilized form of the word, and the only time that I can even say that I've ever even once heard it used as a verb is in the progressive.
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    jacinta said:
    Spree is defined as a verb in our own Wordreference.com but I am skeptical. My dictionary (American Heritage) shows it only as a noun and I have only heard it used as a noun, never a verb.
    Indeed! I concur that "spree" is not a verb. Neither American Heritage nor Merriam-Webster say it can be a verb. Maybe it is old British? I've never heard "spree" as a verb either.

    In any case, don't use "spree" as a verb -- nobody will know what you mean. :)
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Nick said:
    Indeed! I concur that "spree" is not a verb. Neither American Heritage nor Merriam-Webster say it can be a verb. Maybe it is old British? I've never heard "spree" as a verb either.
    This is what I found at http://www.takeourword.com/Issue107.html
    What is the etymology of spree? It has to be the hardest word to find an origin for.
    .... its etymology is obscure, but a good possible explanation has been documented. Spree is first recorded in 1804 with the meaning "lively or boisterous frolic". A variant form was spray. In Scotland, there were the terms spreagh and spreath, both meaning "foray" or "cattle raid". Those derive from Gaelic spreidh "cattle". So a spree may originally have been a cattle raid.
    The Online Etymology Dictionary says:

    spree frolic, drinking bout," 1804, slang, perhaps an alteration of Fr. esprit "lively wit" (see esprit). Ir. spre seems to be a loan-word from O.N. sprakr.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Nick said:
    Indeed! I concur that "spree" is not a verb. Neither American Heritage nor Merriam-Webster say it can be a verb. Maybe it is old British? I've never heard "spree" as a verb either.
    In any case, don't use "spree" as a verb -- nobody will know what you mean. :)

    Yes, Nick it is dated. Look at my post above. :thumbsup: :p
     

    Jonegy

    Senior Member
    UK - English
    My old Collins concurs - spree - an over indulgence.... etymology scottish cattle rustling.

    Not exactly the same - but very similar "Splurge"........

    (just to confuse things) lol
     

    ainjibi

    New Member
    usa, english
    To all of you who responded to my original query about "spree" - thank you very very much. This is a great forum. And to the gentleman from Argentina(lovely country btw) - I do concur with the gist of the sentiment voiced in the quotation in Spanish.
     
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