spring (mechanical)

< Previous | Next >

Simbex

Member
Russian
Hi, everyone!

Please, could you tell me what are the right verbs to use with "spring" as a mechanical part? Are these "compress" and "relax"? Could you give some short examples of how you would use them in active and passive, please. Thanks!
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    A compression spring -> compress and relax
    An extension spring -> extend and relax
    A leaf-spring -> flex and relax
    A torsion bar -> twist and relax

    Could you give some short examples of how you would use them in active and passive, please.
    No. That is your job. Please give your examples.
     

    Simbex

    Member
    Russian
    PaulQ, thank you very much!

    As for "compress", I feel quite confident with it. I only have some doubts about usage of "relax". What do you think about the following sentences:

    A) Loosen nut (2) until spring (3) relaxes completely.
    B) Loosen nut (2) until spring (3) is relaxed completely.

    Are they both OK? If not, which one would sound more natural to the English ear?
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    A is idiomatic and "normal".

    Technically, you might say "until the spring is free from any tension" but this is somewhat formal.

    In what context will you be using this?
     

    Simbex

    Member
    Russian
    Thank you once more! Now I have a clear picture. At least, it seems so... )

    This is for technical documentation. I have repeatedly found myself in a situtation when I'm not sure about which word to use to make a phrase sound natural. I thought it was high time I clarified things)
     
    Last edited:

    Simbex

    Member
    Russian
    I' ve got one more question to ask, please.

    Is it OK to say "Relax the spring" (A)?
    Or should this be something "Relieve tension on the spring" (B)?

    This is for the context I mentioned above, i.e. a manual.

    The exact phrase in my language reads:

    "Relax springs of half-couplings"
    (I omit "the" for the sake of brevity). I.e. it is the reader (operator/mechanic) who should "relax" the spring.

    I cannot figure out how I can make "spring" the subject of the sentence to use "relax" .... comfortably (I mean I don't feel comfortable with option A).

    On the other hand, option B looks a bit better.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Is it OK to say "Relax the spring" (A)?
    Or should this be something "Relieve tension on the spring" (B)?
    In this case, I would use "Relieve tension". Relax as a verb is fine with people or muscles, but it does not work very well as an active verb with an inanimate object.

    "Relax springs of half-couplings"
    (I omit "the" for the sake of brevity). I.e. it is the reader (operator/mechanic) who should "relax" the spring.

    I cannot figure out how I can make "spring" the subject of the sentence to use "relax" .... comfortably (I mean I don't feel comfortable with option A).

    On the other hand, option B looks a bit better.
    I don't know what exactly you are describing, but you could say something like:
    Relieve the tension in the half-coupling springs.​
    It might be that "half-coupling springs" is not a suitable phrase for the springs. Omit "the"s if you like, but it probably reads better leaving them in. It depends of course on context (as does almost everything in English).

    In "Relax springs...", "springs" is the object. The verb is in the imperative mode, so the subject (implied) is "you".
     

    Simbex

    Member
    Russian
    In "Relax springs...", "springs" is the object. The verb is in the imperative mode, so the subject (implied) is "you".
    That's the reason I thought the phrase sounded somewhat awkward. Thanks. Uncle Jack! I'll use "relieve tension", then.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top