squash - marrow - courgette - zucchini

< Previous | Next >
Status
Not open for further replies.

shamblesuk

Senior Member
England, English
Sul dizionario ci sono due spiegamenti per 'zucchina/o/i' - 'squash' e 'courgette'

Qual'e la differenza? Cosa dovrei cercare per una ricetta per 'squash soup'? Non voglio fare 'courgette soup' in errore!
 
  • Saoul

    Senior Member
    Italian
    As far as I know "squash" is zucca (marrow) CLICK HERE

    Zucchina is "courgette" BE "zucchini" AE. CLICK HERE

    shamblesuk said:
    Sul dizionario ci sono due spiegazioni (definizioni) per 'zucchina/o/i' - 'squash' e 'courgette'

    Qual'e la differenza? Cosa dovrei cercare per una ricetta per 'squash soup'? Non voglio fare 'courgette soup' per sbaglio!
     

    Saoul

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Or like this.

    Even in Italy, there are a lot of names for that particular vegetable, zucchina is like the marrow you attached in the north, but it is something different in Sicilia (I can't find any picture on the Internet of the Sicilia zucchina).
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Ok, I'm still quite confused..
    A part from the AE/BE zucchini/courgette, I haven't understood yet how we can possibly find a suitable translation for :marrow, and summer/winter squash.
    There's a dictionary that lists them all under "zucchina" !!

    zucchìna: nf (bot e alim) squash, summer squash, marrow, vegetable marrow, courgette, zucchini (inv).
    I also must say that this Marrow looks like a zucchina to me and squash is not pumpkin..

    I've just found this glossary

    Summer squash:
    (US) Any soft squash with a very limited shelf-life, such as zucchini. Zucca verde estiva, zucca Chioggia (IT). Curcubita spp.
    Winter squash: (US) Any hard squash that stays fresh for months when kept at cool temperatures, such as acorn, butternut, pumpkin (=pompoen (NE), Kuerbis (DE)), kabocha, banana squash, turban, delicata. Zucca, zucca gialla invernale, zucca noce di burro [butternut] (IT). Curcubita maxima.

    Marrow = zuchini???
     
    Last edited:

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    According to Wikipedia a marrow is a large courgette (zucchini in US English)

    Squash
    The problem is that everyone here just says zucchine, no distinction between large or small.
    I've seen that picture of one of the many different kinds of squash /yellow squash), but I don't know its name.

    Let's try using pictures.

    Zucchina (please add your translation in English)

    Yellow squash (if anyone knows how we call this in Italian, please add the translation here)

    Winter squash (if anyone knows how we call this in Italian, please add the translation here)

    Summer squash (if anyone knows how we call this in Italian, please add the translation here)

    Marrow (Still zucchine to me, although they are huge)
     
    Last edited:

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    According to this website:

    ...the difference between a marrow, a zucchini or a courgette. .....all three come from the same plant (summer squash of the cucurbit family) and are given names depending on their stages of growth. They can either be yellow or green and generally have similar shape to a ridged cucumber. The word zucchini comes from the Italian zucchino, meaning a small squash or immature marrow. Courgette, on the other hand, is French term for zucchini. The term squash comes from the Indian skutasquash meaning "green thing eaten green."

    That same article says:

    Courgettes are the baby fruit of several types of marrow, harvested when they are 14 x 4 cm long, the size of a cigar.

    Zucchinis are the fruits of the same plant harvested when they are 15 to 20 cm long.

    Marrows are the semi-mature fruits which have reached full size.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Zucchina - zucchini (as stated by Charles)

    Yellow squash - this particular one is called "crook-neck squash" - zucca

    Winter squash - zucca

    Summer squash - the same as "yellow squash" - "crook-neck" -zucca

    Marrow - green striped squash, cushaw squash, (Cucurbita mixta) - zucca
    I (and maybe other Italians as well) have a problem here: zucca is only pumpkin for me, that's why it's confusing.
    If you pop to a groceries' and ask for zucca, what you're going to be offered is pumpkin.

    Courgettes are the baby fruit of several types of marrow, harvested when they are 14 x 4 cm long, the size of a cigar.

    Zucchinis are the fruits of the same plant harvested when they are 15 to 20 cm long.

    Marrows are the semi-mature fruits which have reached full size.
    This is cool: now I definitely know what English speakers mean with marrow and courgettes/zucchini.
     

    TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I (and maybe other Italians as well) have a problem here: zucca is only pumpkin for me, that's why it's confusing.
    If you pop to a groceries' and ask for zucca, what you're going to be offered is pumpkin.
    Yeah, I know.
    I Googled a bit, and "zucca" is the most common term.

    But I have a definitive source!:)

    I grow crook-neck squash in my garden every year. A native Roman was visiting us and I took him out to see the "orto" (I learned that from him - I was using "giardino" incorrectly before that day).
    I pointed to the squash and asked how it was said in Italy, and he said "zucca".
    I said, isn't that a pumpkin? and he said "yes" - same word, different "fruits and vegetables".
    :D
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    But most AE speakers don't. We have zucchini and baby zucchini, and if you let them grow too large, they become baseball bats. ;)

    Elisabetta
    Huh..
    So what's a marrow for you then? Not a large zucchini?

    I grow crook-neck squash in my garden every year. A native Roman was visiting us and I took him out to see the "orto" (I learned that from him - I was using "giardino" incorrectly before that day).
    I pointed to the squash and asked how it was said in Italy, and he said "zucca".
    I said, isn't that a pumpkin? and he said "yes" - same word, different "fruits and vegetables".
    :D
    I kinda had the same problem with Her dad's orto last summer: he showed me what he was growing and he called half of that stuff "squash"!!
    I think we don't even have most of them here.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Pual, I would call this (from your post above) a large green squash, maybe a large zucchini. The term marrow is not used in AE.

    Elisabetta
    Elisabetta, that same picture is shown on this page as a 'marrow', and it's from an American website.The link I provided in Post 14 is also American. This American dictionary says that the word 'marrow' is British but makes no such distinction for 'marrow squash'. It's all so complicated! :)
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    Charles, you can always find exceptions, which is why I qualified my statement directly above to say these terms are not much used in AE. :) I have never heard an AE speaker say marrow in this context.

    Also, if you're referring to the Backyard Gardner site as American (based, perhaps, on its WA address), I'd point out that it also uses the spelling acclimatise, rather than the typically AE acclimatize, so maybe the writer for the site is not AE. ;)

    Elisabetta
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Charles, you can always find exceptions, which is why I qualified my statement directly above to say these terms are not much used in AE. :) I have never heard an AE speaker say marrow in this context.

    Also, if you're referring to the Backyard Gardner site as American (based, perhaps, on its WA address), I'd point out that it also uses the spelling acclimatise, rather than the typically AE acclimatize, so maybe the writer for the site is not AE. ;)

    Elisabetta
    I suppose that 's' stuck out like dog's testicles on a cat, Elisabetta!!! :D

    So what about 'marrow squash'? Do you ever hear that in your neck of the woods? :)
     
    Last edited:

    Hermocrates

    Senior Member
    Italian & British English (bilingual)
    Per quanto riguarda i nomi in italiano, invece, sono andato a fare un po' di ricerca su siti di agraria e simili e qui riassumo quanto trovato.

    In botanica le zucche si suddividono in quattro specie: Cucurbita maxima - Cucurbita moschata - Cucurbita pepo - Cucurbita melanosperma.
    In pratica si distinguono in Zucche da zucchini e Zucche da inverno. Fonte
    In realtà controllando su Wikispecies risultano esitere molte più sottospecie di queste 4 elencate sul sito Agraria, ma forse non sono coltivate in Italia.

    Comunque, andando in dettaglio a cercare le singole sottospecie su Wikispecies e basandosi sul nome scientifico si arriva a queste corrispondenze in italiano e in inglese:

    Cucurbita maxima (Wikispecies): squash (Wikipedia ENG) - zucca dolce (Wikipedia ITA)
    Cucurbita moschata (Wikispecies): butternut squash (Wikipedia ENG) - foto
    Cucurbita pepo (Wikispecies): zucchini (Wikipedia ENG) - zucchine (Wikipedia ITA)

    Il problema è che in inglese il termine "squash" è molto generico, non legato a una singola sottospecie, ma usato per sottospecie diverse anche se di aspetto simile. Un "pumpkin" (zuccona arancione) così come un "gourd" (la zucchetta a forma di arachide) per intenderci sono due tipi di "squash".

    Secondo questo altro sito, in italiano abbiamo:

    - zucca comune (forma tonda, più o meno schiacciata, dimensioni diverse)
    - zucca napoletana (forma allungata, buccia verde con polpa arancione, filamentosa e ricca di acqua)
    - zucca Berettina (buccia meno dura rispetto alle precedenti con polpa gialla, fibrosa e e ricca di acqua)
    - zucche ornamentali dette anche "da vino" (dovrebbe corrispondere quindi al "gourd" in inglese)

    Questo sito di cucina dà la seguente distinzione in italiano:

    Queste sono la Cucurbita maxima (zucca lunga) e la Cucurbita moschata (zucca tonda), mentre la Cucurbita pepo viene raccolta acerba e consumata come tale (zucchine). Fonte
    Negli altri siti che ho cercato invece ho trovato nomi troppo specifici di singole varietà locali (Marina di Chioggia, Lunga di Napoli, Americana, Zucca lunga d'Italia, etc).

    Scorrendo in basso questa pagina del sito Agraria si trovano molte varietà divise in base alla sottospecie.
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    Che efficienza, Rye! :D
    Purtroppo la tua ricerca non fa altro che ribadire che, a meno di andare sullo scientifico, noi non facciamo tutte quelle distinzioni che fanno gli anglofoni (e a me non sembra neppure di aver mai visto dal fruttivendolo nessuno dei molti tipi di squash che si trovano in US).
    Per noi ci sono zucchine e zucche, punto.
     

    Hermocrates

    Senior Member
    Italian & British English (bilingual)
    Che efficienza, Rye! :D
    Purtroppo la tua ricerca non fa altro che ribadire che, a meno di andare sullo scientifico, noi non facciamo tutte quelle distinzioni che fanno gli anglofoni (e a me non sembra neppure di aver mai visto dal fruttivendolo nessuno dei molti tipi di squash che si trovano in US).
    Per noi ci sono zucchine e zucche, punto.
    Sì, penso anche io che la morale sia questa. E tra l'altro non c'è proprio esatta corrispondenza di termini tra una lingua e l'altra.

    Mio suocero che ha la passione dell'orticello le classifica così (penso alla fin fine rifletta abbastanza bene il punto di vista del parlante medio):

    - zucche, zuccone: i "pumpkin", quelli tondi e arancioni. (Equivalgono nella sua classificazione alle zucche commestibili. :D )

    - zucchette ornamentali: tutti i tipi di piccole zucche ("squash") dalle forme insolite (tipo queste); di solito lui le considera solo da esposizione, non da mangiare (anche se alcuni tipi si possono mangiare, almeno quando sono "giovani")

    - zucchine: quelle allungate e verdi, che si raccolgono quando sono giovani. (Anche queste commestibili :D)

    Comunque io penso che l'italiano "zucca", anche se solitamente associato al "pumpkin" (cioé alla zucca tonda arancione) sia anche usato per rendere il più generico "squash". Per esempio, queste mio suocero le chiama "zucche spinose" (e si mangiano :D)

    Solo forse, il "pumpkin" è più diffuso, anche perché è più versatile in cucina di altri tipi di zucca, e per questo è il tipo più immediatamente associato al termine.
     

    florecica

    Banned
    My grandma calls all the types of squash that have been posted "zucche ornamentali", because she used to paint them instead of eating them like normal pumpkins. Now, I have never eaten them nor seen anybody eating such pumpkins in northern Italy.

    The other ones, marrows too, are zucchine to me.
     

    monalisa!

    Banned
    spanish
    Che efficienza, Rye! :D
    Purtroppo la tua ricerca non fa altro che ribadire che, a meno di andare sullo scientifico, noi non facciamo tutte quelle distinzioni che fanno gli anglofoni (e a me non sembra neppure di aver mai visto dal fruttivendolo nessuno dei molti tipi di squash che si trovano in US).
    Per noi ci sono zucchine e zucche, punto.
    Salve!
    Sicuro, l'inglese ha un lessico più ampio, e in US ci sono molte più varietà che da noi (specie delle winter squash) anche perchè il genere Cucurbita è stato portato dal nuovo mondo, prima c'era solo il genere Lagenaria . Ho fatto ricerche, forse la situazione non è così malvagia:

    squash è un termine generale (per il genere Cucurbita e anche Lagenaria , include zucca e zucchina( Cucurbita Pepo)), winter/ summer indica solo il periodo di consumazione: Cucurbita maxima= winter squash, Cucurbita Pepo = summer squash)
    pumpkin è il termine conosciuto e usato generalmente (= squash = gourd = zucca ), (anche in alcune regioni italiane zucca si usa per zucchina))
    gourd include zucche, zucchine, zucche ornamentali e talvolta anche meloni e viene di solito usata i gusci secchi ornamentali, questo sembra il termine più ampio (SOED)

    i tre termini sono sinonimi (come tassonomia) ma non sono considerati tali dalla gente comune.

    zucchini
    ( Cucurbita specie: Pepo, = zucchina, zucchino) in BrE si trova anche courgette (petit courge, francese, courge = zucca= gourd) e anche [vegetable] marrow per varietà di zucchina un pò più grandi (SOED)
    i tre termini sono sinonimi e sono percepiti come tali anche se usati individualmente.

    La zucchina non è altro che una zucca consumata prima che giunga a completa maturazione.
    i frutti piccoli di ogni varietà sono baby (zucchini/ marrow ...)
     
    Last edited:
    I have always and ever heard "baby marrows", for the normal, standard zucchine of ours, in South Africa and in Southern Africa in general, to an extent that I was convinced that was the standard term everywhere:confused:

    I'm puzzled now... nobody has cited "baby marrows" a part from monalisa in the last post, but with reference to "miniature" zucchini:)
     

    monalisa!

    Banned
    spanish
    I have always and ever heard "baby marrows", for the normal, standard zucchine of ours, in South Africa
    Come ho detto, la zucchina (contrariamente a quello che molti inglesi pensano) non è altro che una specie (Pepo) di zucca che si mangia prima che arriva a maturazione.
    (Questo avviene anche per alcune specie di melone che poi vengono chiamati caroselli)

    se la zucchina è molto piccola poi, in inglese diventa baby
    https://www.google.it/search?q="bab...Wm4ATVpoDABg&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1241&bih=593
    forse perchè gli stranieri non percepiscono che zucchini è già un diminutivo (??)

    (P.S. In Sud Africa forse risentono del BrE marrow) (??)
     
    Last edited:

    monalisa!

    Banned
    spanish
    se può interessare, ecco una classificazione più scientifica:

    (Cucurbitacee, SOED) gourd, family: Cucurbitacee; genera: [Cucumis], Cucurbita, Lagenaria (siceraria commonly referred to as [bottle-]gourds SOED)

    gourd-pumpkin-squash
    ...genera: Cucurbita, Lagenaria
    pumpkin (SOED)..............genus: Cucurbita species: Maxima = winter/ autumn squash (commonly referred to as pumpkin), species: Pepo marrow (SOED)

    [vegetable] marrow...........genus: Cucurbita species: Pepo (also called courgette and zucchini in AmE)
    ........................................genus: Cucurbita species Muschata cv. Tromboncino = climbing zucchini
    ........................................genus: Lagenaria species: siceraria (zucchini before the discovery of America, or bottle-gourds)
    marrows are usually referred to as summer squash
     
    Status
    Not open for further replies.
    < Previous | Next >
    Top