Squire, Esquire, tenant-in-chief

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mzg

Senior Member
Spain, Spanish
Hello again

I keep finding these words in my texts and sometimes they seem to refer to the same thing and other times they don’t.


"Squire" seems to be gentry (not nobility) landowners (terrateniente?)



"Esquire" is low rank nobility (Hidalgo?)



And Tenant-in-chief . Is this “señor feudal” (Nobility with land)

Thanks a lot
 
  • Neilito

    Senior Member
    Ireland/English
    Hi mzg, it would be very important to specify the historical period from which these texts come, since the meaning of Squire for example depends very much on the period:
    - the main landowner in rural community (say 1500s to 1900s)
    - a young man who attends a knight (feudal or medieval) = esquire in this context
    - a form of address for a man (Brit., rather rare, see Monty Python "hello, squire".
    - John Smith Esq. : a recently obsolete alternative for Mr. John Smith

    It sounds like you are in the medieval period. However a tenant is someone who rents property, does not own it. I can't explain the phrase "tenant-in-chief", except that "in chief" means "the main one".
     

    garryknight

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    "Squire" is "escudero", and "esquire" is the way you'd address a squire. As for "tenant-in-chief", I think that these days he or she would be called "chairman of the tenant's association".
     

    mzg

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish
    Thanks Neilito and GarryKnight (you had to know something about chilvary with that name) for your help

    This tenant-in-chief keeps worrying me though :)
    Bye
     
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