squire make a stir

gil12345

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,

I am totally at a loss about what it says.

"Does not he drive for squire make a stir?"

Squire is a noun, which means rural landowner. A noun plus a verb phrase, which comes after for. I don't feel it is correct.

Could you explain it for me?

Gil
 
  • JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    It makes no sense to me either, but if you would give us more context, we might be able to help you. Where did you see this (what book or movie), who said it, and under what circumstances did he say it?
     

    gil12345

    Senior Member
    chinese
    It makes no sense to me either, but if you would give us more context, we might be able to help you. Where did you see this (what book or movie), who said it, and under what circumstances did he say it?
    Sorry about inconvenience. It is one sentence from Waldern by Henry Thoreau.

    "Talk of a divinity in man! Look at the teamster on the highway, wending to market by day or night; does any divinity stir within him? His highest duty to fodder and water his horses! What is his destiny to him compared with the shipping interests? Does not he drive for Squire Make-a-Stir?

    Thanks
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Does not he drive for Squire Make-a-Stir? = Is he not employed as a driver by/for the man called "Squire Make-a-Stir"?

    We assume "Squire Make-a-Stir" to be a fictitious or generic character indicating a reasonably powerful man who "makes a stir" -> creates some publicity; is well-known, etc.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Squire Make-a-Stir
    The capital letters show us that this is a title and name. The hyphens show us that the three words in 'Make-a-Stir' have been put together to make up the name.

    In other words, it is an invented name. We often invent names and titles using verbal ideas to express a characteristic of a person.

    Think of a mobile phone trader in a street market. We might say 'Look, there goes Mr. Get-Your-Mobile-Here'.

    In Thoreau's book, Squire Make-a-Stir is not the name of an actual person, but a made-up name for a type of person, namely a merchant who is always busy, making a stir (creating movement and change).
     

    gil12345

    Senior Member
    chinese
    The capital letters show us that this is a title and name. The hyphens show us that the three words in 'Make-a-Stir' have been put together to make up the name.

    In other words, it is an invented name. We often invent names and titles using verbal ideas to express a characteristic of a person.

    Think of a mobile phone trader in a street market. We might say 'Look, there goes Mr. Get-Your-Mobile-Here'.

    In Thoreau's book, Squire Make-a-Stir is not the name of an actual person, but a made-up name for a type of person, namely a merchant who is always busy, making a stir (creating movement and change).
    Thank you both so much.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    On second thoughts, after seeing post 4, I need to revise my interpretation of the meaning of the name.

    The teamster or driver ('carter' or 'waggoner' in British usage of that period) is driving a cart full of goods to market. He is employed by a merchant.
    However, Squire Make-a-Stir is not the merchant. Squire Make-a-stir is the end consumer who buys the fancy product sold by the merchant.

    In other words, PaulQ is right: in this case, the idea of making a stir is that of drawing attention to yourself, making people look at you and talk about you.
    The word Squire shows us that this is not a merchant, but as you say a landowner, who does not need to work and can afford to buy the expensive goods sold by the merchant.

    Thus Thoreau is saying that the driver, employed by the merchant, is actually working for the benefit of the Squire, the end user in the economic chain.
     
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