Stag Party

JazzByChas

Senior Member
American English
What exactly is a Stag Party? Is it an event attended only by males/men, or does it have to do with something sexual?

Further, what would be the female equivalent. The only thing I can think of is, "Hen Party," but I don't think too many women would appreciate that!

Thoughts?
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Stag Party - an event attended by a prospective Bridegroom and his so-called friends (male) as a final celebration of his soon-to-conclude single status. There may be females present for part of the event.

    Hen Party - an event attended by a prospective Bride and her.... etc, etc, etc.

    I will leave it for others more willing to spell out lurid details to explain exactly what is involved.

    Suffice to say that what originally was a short, though memorable - no, wrong word - remarkable evening has been transformed into a weekend of ....
    Usually these take place in the European Capital that happens to have the cheapest airfares on the weekend chosen for the event.

    Both Stag Party and Hen Party are accepted and used by those involved or either sex. Usually, though, replace Party with Weekend.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    THIS thread might give you a bit of information into stag parties.

    I believe in modern BE, stag parties are what we in the US call "bachelor" parties, where a groom to be goes out with his friends and has one last "night of freedom" before being tied to the old "ball and chain." Just how much "freedom" is exercised varies from groom to groom.

    Most bachelor parties involve drinking, and usually some kind of naked woman, either a private stripper, a trip to a strip club, or on salacious video.

    Brides-to-be in the US are feted with bachelorette parties, which are similar to the British "Hen's Night." Most bachelorette parties in the US are tame in comparison to their male equivalents, although can also get rowdy, with the bride being subjected to wearing condom-covered veils and tasked to peform strange acts in public in order to bring attention to herself.

    Both are becoming seemingly rowdier and raunchier.

    Stag nights originally (in the 1950s and before) might have been closer to what Foxfirebrand describes in this interesting thread about "smokers."
     

    JazzByChas

    Senior Member
    American English
    So, a Stag Party is always the Bachelor Party?

    I thought it might just be where a bunch of guys get together, and not necessarily a Bachelor Party...

    E.g. when women get together, it is sometimes called a "coffee klatch..." ('course, there might be both genders in attendance...:) )
     

    MrPedantic

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Hello Jazz

    You can also talk about a "hen night" or a "stag night".

    A (British) stag night usually involves intoxication to the point of unconsciousness. The groom-to-be is often tied or handcuffed to a lamp post at the end of the proceedings; occasionally his friends will allow him to retain his clothing.

    A hen night on the other hand can resemble a rout of Bacchantes. Intoxicated males on a stag night are usually incapable of rapid movement after an hour or two, and thus harmless; but if you're a lone male in a dark place, you really don't want to encounter a marauding hen party.

    MrP
     

    Ralf

    Senior Member
    German
    JazzByChas said:
    ... E.g. when women get together, it is sometimes called a "coffee klatch..." ('course, there might be both genders in attendance...:) )
    I never heard "coffe klatch" in English. Funny enough, a German "Kaffeeklatsch" refers to a more or less regular gathering attended by elderly ladies (60+) gossiping about such important things as cooking recipes or their latest experiences with meteorosensitivity. Judging from what I have read in this thread, far from the spirit and the mood of a Hen Party. ;)

    Ralf
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Oh <Groan> I am going to have to go into a little more detail.

    The Stag and Hen Party culture (I have kids of the relevant age) now requires a minimum of two nights, three days, carefully planned activity. The expenditure on the event is likely to be a large percentage of the overall cost of the expected wedding - think about it, a dozen people off for a long weekend, travel, accommodation, food, ENTERTAINMENT, fines, legal expenses, damages, presents ...

    The entertainment typically includes a broad range of very eccentric activity that none of the participants are fit for or experienced in. Motor racing, paint balling, bunjee-jumping, mud wrestling, archery, abseiling, clay-pigeon shooting, sky diving, para-gliding, pot-holing, snow-boarding... ... and then there will be the inevitable XXXXX-o-gram at a strategic moment and of course the exotic fruit desserts with the sparklers.

    You see, these things used to be happening when the couple were young and grovellingly poor. Every penny they had went into buying another orange-box so they had somewhere to sit. Every pound they spent on the Stag/ Hen Party was another week without food after the wedding.

    Now, people getting married already own (or previously owned) two houses completely furnished and they have two enormous salaries coming in.
     

    JazzByChas

    Senior Member
    American English
    Well, Ralf, I actually heard this from my father-out-law (father of ex-wife), whose family's background is German. So I'm sure this is where the word came from, and is exactly as you described it!:)

    As for the Stag and Hen parties, I guess there is no getting around the fact that they are what we in America call the Bachelor or Bachelorette Parties.'

    I suppose I was thinking of going to a party "stag" which meant without a date (usually for a male).


    Ralf said:
    I never heard "coffe klatch" in English. Funny enough, a German "Kaffeeklatsch" refers to a more or less regular gathering attended by elderly ladies (60+) gossiping about such important things as cooking recipes or their latest experiences with meteorosensitivity. Judging from what I have read in this thread, far from the spirit and the mood of a Hen Party. ;)

    Ralf
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    I'm with you, Chas... when I have heard "Stag Party", I've always thought it was not only the former name of Bachelor Party, I also thought it was used to refer to any males-only party with prurient activities.

    One source (source) corroborates my impression. If we're wrong, however, might we have both drawn incorrect conclusions independently of one another? Maybe we both saw Porky's one too many times. ;)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top