Stake on uniqueness

dec-sev

Senior Member
Russian
Hello.
Can “stake” and “stake on” be used figuratively?
Context:
It’s about jewelry. The idea is that there are mass consumed products (cheap rings, ear-rings, etc) and pieces for the elite. The jewelers whose target group is the latter pretend to create works of art.
Can I use in this context phrases like “Stake on uniqueness” and “whose who stake on art will always win”.
Thanks in advance.
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    No, I'm afraid those don't make sense... either as a statement of philosophy for the company or as an aspirational desire for the consumer. I also think you need a different word than stake: it's not a very "salable" word. You find it most often in contexts that have nothing to do with advertising, e.g. stakeholders, or to have a stake in something.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I'm intrigued by your use of the word pretend in this conext, why can't good jewelry be considered as works of art?
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    No, I'm afraid those don't make sense... either as a statement of philosophy for the company or as an aspirational desire for the consumer. I also think you need a different word than stake: it's not a very "salable" word. You find it most often in contexts that have nothing to do with advertising, e.g. stakeholders, or to have a stake in something.
    Well, in Russian we do use the word figuratively meaning "the stress or emphasis is on..." You can say "Maradona stakes on Messi" That would mean Messi would be a key figure in the team. If "stake" doesn't work here, what do you think would be a better option?
     

    dec-sev

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Is this an advertisement slogan?
    No, it's a phrase from an article about trends in jewelry business. The article swarms with "jurnalistic" clichés and the phrase is one of them. I mean “whose who stake on art will always win” It's a direct translation from Russian and "stake on art" is OK as a metaphor of cliche, you name it. It's a pocker term I guess but in Russian the phrase is used far beyond poker (see the Messi example in my previous post).
    To invest is OK but seems to "business-like" to me, but it's not only about business but rather about vision on the jewelry. As I wrote in my opening post it's about muss production vs. art. If only I understood the Russian author correctly ;)
    The thread was closed for some hours and I didn't expect to get any answers so I advised my friend who had asked me to help him with the translation to use something like "those for art in jewelry will never come off worst". May be "to invest" would have been simplier and better, but we've
    missed the boat :)
    Anyway thanks for the reply.



     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    ... I mean “whose who stake on art will always win” It's a direct translation from Russian and "stake on art" is OK as a metaphor of cliche, you name it. It's a pocker term I guess but in Russian the phrase is used far beyond poker ...
    The verb you're looking for is "bet". "Stake" and "bet" (both noun and verb) are related in English but the verb form of stake is not used that way so until you mentioned poker I was stuck on other meanings of "stake".
    "Those who bet on art will always win." makes sense to me.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top