Stance verb

Zapii

Member
Spanish (Argentina)
Hi...! I would like to know the meaning of "stance verbs"...

it´s like this: " The VP should be made up of a stance verb, an intransitive verb or a verb of movement."

I would be really pleased:)
 
  • elianecanspeak

    Senior Member
    English - EEUU
    I think that a stance verb is a verb that proceeds from or demonstrates the stance of the writer or speaker toward the subject being discussed; it can be used to manipulate the material being presented. In the examples below even though the words of the indirect quote are the same, the stance verb alters the interptretation:

    1. Betsy Haig said she was a union member. (Neutral)

    2. Betsy Haig admitted that she was a member of a union. (This implies that union membership was something she wished to conceal or of which she was ashamed or reluctant to speak)


    1. Don Schwartz said that he had graduated from Swarthmore. (Neutral)

    2. Don Schwartz boasted that he had graduated from Swarthmore. (Implication that he feels superior to others because of his educational background.)

    By using a stance verb a writer or speaker can influence the listener or reader's perception of the person being described.

    If anyone out there has a better understanding, please contribute. I looked at the site below, but wasn't completely sure that I understood it. There were sites that focused on Hebrew, Chinese, etc.

     
    Last edited:

    diaz1063

    New Member
    spanish
    Hi...! I would like to know the meaning of "stance verbs"...

    it´s like this: " The VP should be made up of a stance verb, an intransitive verb or a verb of movement."

    I would be really pleased:)
    hello, stance verbs are verbs like live, stand sit and lie, and they have the ability to be used with the non-progressive aspect to express a permanent state and with the progressive aspect to show a temporary state
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Zapii (if you have been patient enough to wait 9 years for this response),
    I searched online and found "stance verb" used both ways: for verbs that refer to a state, or for those that refer to a speaker's attitude.

    For the first of these uses, if you do a websearch for the phrase "the main stance verbs", you will find several sites that define and give examples—generally the same definition and examples, which seem to be taken from Quirk et al. (Sec. 4.32).

    (Quirk et al. describe stance verbs as "intermediate between the stative and dynamic categories"; it gets complicated.)

    Uses of the term for verbs of attitude are less common, but you can find them also on the Web.
     
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