stand a good vacuum

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Acyang

Member
Chinese - China
I watched a sitcom and there is a conversation like below:

A:Grandma, here we are.
B:I'm in a wheelchair. I'm not blind. I can see where we are. (look around the room) And it could stand a good vacuum.

What does the "stand a good vacuum" mean? Does it mean "this room need to be cleaned"?
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    To stand -> (i) to tolerate; to withstand. (ii) colloquial, to benefit from
    a vacuum (colloquial) -> a vacuuming -> the action of cleaning with a vacuum cleaner

    And it could stand a good vacuum. -> "And this room would benefit from being cleaned with a vacuum cleaner." :thumbsup:

    To vacuum (transitive and intransitive) and to hoover (transitive and intransitive) = to clean with a vacuum cleaner.
     
    Last edited:

    SwissPete

    Senior Member
    Français (CH), AE (California)
    To vacuum is American English.
    To hoover is British English.

    When the lady said "It could stand a good vacuum", she implied "a good vacuum cleaning".
     
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