standard pronunciation of 'outright'? [BE]

jiamajia

Senior Member
Mandarin
Is it 'out-right', or 'ou-tright'? In other words, do you separate t and r?

Thank you.

P.S.: I mean in British English. I know already North Americans separate t from r.
 
  • JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Is it 'out-right', or 'ou-tright'? In other words, do you separate t and r?

    Thank you.

    P.S.: I mean in British English. I know already North Americans separate t from r.
    Are you suggesting that "North Americans" pronounce the word out right with a gap between the out and right? I am confused by this. Where did you learn this?
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I pronounce the t-r like I pronounce "try" and I would be surprised if anyone separated the two words, especially in connected speech...
     

    jiamajia

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Are you suggesting that "North Americans" pronounce the word out right with a gap between the out and right? I am confused by this. Where did you learn this?
    No. I mean they don't do it like ou-tright with tr pronounced as in 'train'.

    Some told me that the British people pronounce it as ou(ou as in ouch)-tright(tr as in train).
     

    Tazzler

    Senior Member
    American English
    I pronounce the t-r like I pronounce "try" and I would be surprised if anyone separated the two words, especially in connected speech...
    Then I'd guess you'd be astonished if you heard me seak then. :) That's the only way I've heard people pronounce that word, I think...
     

    -mack-

    Senior Member
    American English
    According to the Oxford English Dictionary, it's the same in AmE and BrE except for the vowel represented by i, which is obviously just the subtle pronunciation difference between AmE and BrE.

    I'm pretty sure it's not pronounced with the affricate like train — if it is, it's probably just a certain dialect of BrE and not standard BrE.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I agree - a bit like the difference between coal train and colt rain. It will depend on how you say train - I have heard it said a bit like ch-rain, and imagine this is what the question is about. Ouch-right vs. out-right?
     

    jiamajia

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I agree - a bit like the difference between coal train and colt rain. It will depend on how you say train - I have heard it said a bit like ch-rain, and imagine this is what the question is about. Ouch-right vs. out-right?
    Exactly. Do you say out-right (the 't' sound almost unuttered ) or ou-tright(tr as in try, train and trip)?
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    Exactly. Do you say out-right (the 't' sound almost unuttered ) or ou-tright(tr as in try, train and trip)?
    Hi, jiamajia,
    I am a BE speaker, and I pronounce the word more or less as 'ow-trite'. However, cockney-type dialects ignore the 't' altogether, so it sounds like 'ow-rite'.
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    I usually recommend howjsay.com for the "standard" English of England known as RP outright

    However this particular speaker does not pronounce the "t" of "outright" in a crystal clear manner, he is somewhere between the two pronunciations mentioned by Elwintee. Some people would say the t much more clearly.

    Here is another speaker at MacMillan Dictionary (this time you must click the speaker button). http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/outright In this one you can hear how an English speaker says out-right and not ou-tright. The "-" does not indicate a gap. It indicates where the pitch of the voice changes.
     
    Last edited:

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    I usually recommend howjsay.com for the "standard" English of England known as RP outright
    [...]
    Here is another speaker at MacMillan Dictionary
    The first is exactly how I say it, with the t in the middle virtually inaudible.
    The second sounds to me like an artificial 'over-pronunciation'.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I am a BE speaker, and I pronounce the word more or less as 'ow-trite'. However, cockney-type dialects ignore the 't' altogether, so it sounds like 'ow-rite'.
    I would say that cockney-type accents use a glottal stop in place of the "t" rather than missing it out.

    So do many other accents - mine included, unless I'm speaking extremely carefully:).
     

    -mack-

    Senior Member
    American English
    I thought I'd add that in American English, in the word out and in outright, the t's are usually stops and not alveolar taps as in the word "tap." When I pronounce them my tongue doesn't even come close to articulating a tap.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top