standing on the side of your shoe

Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The context comes from Jane Eyre Chapter 6

"Burns" (such it seems was her name: the girls here were all called by their surnames, as boys are elsewhere), "Burns, you are standing on the side of your shoe; turn your toes out immediately." "Burns, you poke your chin most unpleasantly; draw it in." "Burns, I insist on your holding your head up; I will not have you before me in that attitude," &c. &c.
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Hi everyone! I don't quite uderstand the bold part. My understanding is as the pictures shows:
you are standing on the side of your shoe” -> ”When Burns stood, her shoes is like" PB140012_zps26171e39.jpg

"turn your toes out immediately" -> turn-out.jpg
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    She was unlikely to have turned her feet inwards to that extent; it would have been impossible to stand.:) But yes, you've got the idea.
     

    Irelia20150604

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    :DYeah, I quite understand it now. I'd say I failed to find a better picture to shows what I imagine about "you are standing on the side of your shoe", so I uploaded a substitute.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It sounds as if she is standing with one foot planted on the ground and the other foot resting on the outer edge of the sole. Shoe is singular. I doubt an exacting schoolmistress would make a grammatical error. :) With the foot turned to the side, both feet would probably be facing straight forward. Toes pointing slightly at an angle out (not as wide as Charlie Chaplin) would be the correct posture. But in any case, the image, I think, is supposed to indicate someone who is very uncomfortable and is trying not to squirm.

    Anyway, I think everybody got it right away.
     
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