standing tickets?

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jiamajia

Senior Member
Mandarin
If an English-speaking passenger wants to get a train ticket in China, would he understand a response from the counter that says: Sorry, we have got only standing tickets for your train.

(The response means they do have the tickets, but seats not guaranteed.)
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    I would understand "standing tickets" to mean that you are guaranteed to be allowed to get onto the train, but you will have to stand during the journey. If that is the case, then I don't understand why the sentence should begin with "Sorry," since that would typically signal a negative response to the question: "Do you have tickets?" "Sorry, we don't."
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    If an English-speaking passenger wants to get a train ticket in China, would he understand a response from the counter that says: Sorry, we have got only standing tickets for your train.

    (The response means they do have the tickets, but seats not guaranteed.)
    I think yoiu mean "standby" tickets. Standby tickets are tickets that allow you on the train if there is room. If there isn't, you have to wait for the next train to see if there is room on it.

    Oh wait... I might have completely misunderstood. Do the tickets guarantee that you will get on the train but will have to stand?
     
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    jiamajia

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I think yoiu mean "standby" tickets. Standby tickets are tickets that allow you on the train if there is room. If there isn't, you have to wait for the next train to see if there is room on it.

    Oh wait... I might have completely misunderstood. Do the tickets guarantee that you will get on the train but will have to stand?

    The scenario is: every oversold train ticket can't guarantee a seat for the passenger. But you are allowed to board the train to wait until the next stop to see whether any other seated passenger will get off and take the vacant seat if it so happens.
     
    What you are describing is a standard,normal, regular, ordinary ticket on a train with unreserved seats. It is not at all uncommon on commuter railroads (such as the Long Island Rail Road, which serves the suburbs of New York City) for people to stand all the way to their destination because there are no available seats. I have even seen Amtrak trains between New York and Philadelphia that were so full that people stood for the trip. The tickets sold were not called anything other than "tickets".
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    We don't have such an arrangement here, so it's hard to say what it would be called. It woudn't be a standby ticket. I'm with the others as far as "standing ticket". I wouldn't assume I could take a seat if I had been sold a standing ticket.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    No, it won't be a standby ticket, because I think that would mean that you might not even be allowed to board the train. I would understand standing ticket, but will wonder if I could sit if there were empty seats. Would it be possible to say 'a ticket without seat reservation'? There was this arrangement in the old British Rail of a while ago (you had to pay extra for a seat reservation - but if you knew that the train wouldn't be full, you might not pay for this): this doesn't apply now though.
     

    Centa

    New Member
    Chinese & Taiwanese- Taiwan
    We do have such "standing ticket" (or should be call stand ticket) in my place, and it is about 20% off than tickets with seat reserved. People are guaranteed to get on the train as long as they have tickets and able to sit vacant seats till the owners on board. But, you could not buy standing tickets as long as there are unsold normal tickets (with seats).

    --Centa
     

    Nunty

    Senior Member
    Hebrew-US English (bilingual)
    No, it won't be a standby ticket, because I think that would mean that you might not even be allowed to board the train. I would understand standing ticket, but will wonder if I could sit if there were empty seats. Would it be possible to say 'a ticket without seat reservation'? There was this arrangement in the old British Rail of a while ago (you had to pay extra for a seat reservation - but if you knew that the train wouldn't be full, you might not pay for this): this doesn't apply now though.
    That is the present arrangement in Israel. I just checked on the English site, and they offer "tickets" which are for unassigned seating (and perhaps standing in the aisle if it is particularly crowded) and "reserved seat tickets", which are for assigned seats in a designated carriage.
     

    jiamajia

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    I agree with Centa on the same situation both countries of China and Taiwan have in this case. But does 'stand ticket' make more sense to native English speakers?
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I agree with Centa on the same situation both countries of China and Taiwan have in this case. But does 'stand ticket' make more sense to native English speakers?
    Not to this BE speaker. In the context you describe I would expect "standing ticket".
    I'm not familiar with the concept on public transport, but it is familiar in the context of public events where there are some seats but a large area for standing.
    in context
    Tickets for the show are on sale now. Seated and standing tickets available
    Interesting - both examples are from Ireland :)

    (I think of a "stand ticket" as a ticket that entitles you to sit in a stand."
    stand 4 a large raised tiered structure for spectators. )
     
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    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, standing tickets will be understood - for example, to refer to the Arena section of the Royal Albert Hall, or for the Yard section of the Globe Theatre.

    PS: Panj, your first link takes me to a google news page which doesn't contain 'standing tickets'. Incomplete link address?
     
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