Start, bench, drop

Sheikh_14

Senior Member
English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
Dear Foreros,

Start, bench, drop are basic nomenclature that refer to where a player will feature in a game of football (soccer to Americans). If you start that means you are in the initial 11, if you are benched you are left on the subs bench and lastly you are dropped if you aren't to feature at all. I was wondering how you would refer to the three in various other languages predominately European and Middle Eastern.

The above is also a game which is played in a similar manner to smash, marry, kill.
So football affocianados or otherwise be sure to jump on this gravy train.

Regards,
Sheikh
 
  • Circunflejo

    Senior Member
    Castellano de Castilla
    Spanish:

    Start: estar en el once, salir de inicio.
    Bench: estar en el banquillo.
    Drop: no estar convocado/a, estar fuera de la convocatoria, no haber sido concovado/a.
     
    Greek:

    Start: «Έναρξη» [ˈe̞nark͡s̠i] (fem.) or «σέντρα» [ˈs̠e̞ndra] (fem.).
    -The former is a native word, meaning initialisation, opening of a precedure, introduction < Κoine 3rd declension feminine noun «ἔναρξις/ἐνάρξεως» énarksis (nom. sinɡ.)/ĕnárksĕōs (ɡen. sinɡ.) --> introduction, a compound: Prefix and preposition «ἐν» ĕn + Classical v. «ἄρχω» ắrkʰō.
    -The latter is a loan from Eng. centre > «σέντρα». It's solely football/soccer jargon. From the two, «σέντρα» is the most commonly used by the sportcasters.

    Bench: «Πάγκος» [ˈpaŋɡo̞s̠] (masc.). It's a mediaeval loan from Italian: banco > Byz. Gr. «πάγκος/μπάγκος» pánkos or bánkos (both masc.). The benched player is called «παγκίτης» [paɲˈɟitis̠] (masc.) or «αναπληρωματικός» [anapliɾo̞matiˈko̞s̠] (masc.).
    -The former is a colloquialism, meaning of the bench, belonging to the bench.
    -The latter is the most commonly used adjective by the sportcasters, a compound: Prefix and preposition «ἀνά» ănắ + MoGr v. Classical v. «πληρώνω» [pliˈɾo̞no̞] --> to fill, complete, fulfill < Classical v. «πληρόω/πληρῶ» plēróō (uncontracted)/plērô (contracted). «Αναπληρωματικός» is literally the player in reserve.

    Drop: Periphrasis «εκτός ενδεκάδας» [e̞ˈkto̞s̠e̞nðe̞ˈkaðas̠] --> out of the eleven.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan

    to start:

    · jugar/sortir d'inici [to play/to 'go out (into the field)' initially],​
    · ser/jugar a l'alineació inicial (or a l'onze inicial) [to be/play in the starting lineup (or in the starting 'eleven')​
    to bench:
    · ser suplent [to be reserve/substitute]​
    · quedar-se a la banqueta [to stay in the bench]​
    · escalfar banqueta [to warm the bench up] (colloquial usage)​
    to be dropped:
    · ser/quedar fora de la convocatòria [to be out of the call-up]​
    · no ser convocat [not be called up]​
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    Spanish:

    Start: estar en el once, salir de inicio.
    Bench: estar en el banquillo.
    Drop: no estar convocado/a, estar fuera de la convocatoria, no haber sido concovado/a.
    I see, so Spanish goes about it by describing the entire situation rather than opting for one-word verbs like in English? Catalan opts for the same procedure. I would have thought that they had coined their own alternatives. Just as remontada was adopted in English because of how nifty the term was.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    I see, so Spanish goes about it by describing the entire situation rather than opting for one-word verbs like in English? Catalan opts for the same procedure. I would have thought that they had coined their own alternatives. Just as remontada was adopted in English because of how nifty the term was.
    True, but that is because we are offering the translation in full and out of a context. We wouldn't know what that 'start' means in English either if not provided with the context. In the same way, when in context, we don't have to say the full thing in Spanish or Catalan (we can just say juguen, surten, queden fora, etc). But generally speaking, it's also true that the structure of English allows it to usually be more concise that the Romance languages.
     

    Sheikh_14

    Senior Member
    English- United Kingdom, Urdu, Punjabi
    True, but that is because we are offering the translation in full and out of a context. We wouldn't know what that 'start' means in English either if not provided with the context. In the same way, when in context, we don't have to say the full thing in Spanish or Catalan (we can just say juguen, surten, queden fora, etc). But generally speaking, it's also true that the structure of English allows it to usually be more concise that the Romance languages.

    Ok so let's suppose we know precisely what the context is and you've been asked to start one, bench one and drop one. Would it suffice to say playing Xavi, benching Iniesta and resting/dropping (the former is kinder) Busquets in the Catalan and Spanish variants or would you instead have to opt for phrases? NB: This is a challenge game which is quite popular on social media where you are given three individuals and three scenarios and have to allocate each one. It can involve sports, romance etc.

    English is indeed very concise on the matter and one of the few languages where you can 'play' a player to mean that player will feature. Can you 'play' a player in Spanish and Catalan as well i.e. is such a term used which would suggest that they've been brought on the field to play?

    Just for context I'll add the sentence "x hates being benched."

    I would be interested to learn whether verbs for
    1. Playing/starting.
    2. Benching and
    3. Dropping or resting
    Exist in the romance languages amongst others. Or do you instead opt for was brought on the field from the start or sat on the bench instead?
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Ok so let's suppose we know precisely what the context is and you've been asked to start one, bench one and drop one. Would it suffice to say playing Xavi, benching Iniesta and resting/dropping (the former is kinder) Busquets in the Catalan and Spanish variants or would you instead have to opt for phrases? NB: This is a challenge game which is quite popular on social media where you are given three individuals and three scenarios and have to allocate each one. It can involve sports, romance etc.
    You could say indeed that Xavi juga and Busquets descansa (literally, 'rests') -well, if we update, Xavi coaches. :D I can't think of any right know for benching, but the thing is, often commentators omit verbs and say a la banqueta 'in the bench' straight away, etc. So it's not as if a whole sentence is said all the time.

    Can you 'play' a player in Spanish and Catalan as well i.e. is such a term used which would suggest that they've been brought on the field to play?
    No. When the meaning is causative, you need the verb 'to make' previously in both languages: hacer jugar a un jugador (Spanish), fer jugar un jugador (Catalan).

    Just for context I'll add the sentence "x hates being benched."
    (Spanish) X odia/detesta/no soporta estar en el banquillo.
    (Catalan) X odia/detesta/no suporta ser a la banqueta.
     
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