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sunyaer

Senior Member
Chinese
Self-made sentences:

1. "We will start at 5:00pm."

2. "We will get started at 5:00pm."

I do not see the difference between the above two sentences, but have noticed that most natives tend to use sentence 2, which has "get started". Why?
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I agree with your observation. People seem to preference (2) though there's little-to-no difference in literal meaning between the two.

    I can imagine users of (2) defending it on the basis that it's friendlier, and more inclusive sounding.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm not sure that I can answer that question, I'm afraid. I should have put it in quotes and it was remiss of me not to have done so.

    I think it's supposed to mean something nice though - something warm and friendly like 'we're all in this together'. It's an ill-defined term that's often used in politics, where ill-defined terms are really quite useful.

    On the other hand, it might be argued that "We will start at 5:00pm." is a little cold and machine like, and that might account for the popularity of (2). See what others say.
     
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