start off misty

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi.

This sentence is from cambridge.org:

The morning will start off misty. (source: misty)

I think "start off" is a verb phrase here, and it means "begin", so it should be followed with a noun. "start off mist".

May I have your opinion?
 
  • Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    The morning will start off misty.

    In that sentence, the adjective 'misty' is correct.
    Here's my understanding: misty is an adjective and start off is a verb phrase, right? usually a verb follows an adverb, not an adjective. Is there a grammar rule here?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Here's my understanding: misty is an adjective and start off is a verb phrase, right? usually a verb follows an adverb, not an adjective. Is there a grammar rule here?
    There are no "grammar rules" in English, only guidelines as to what educated native speakers say or write.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    Here's my understanding: misty is an adjective and start off is a verb phrase, right? usually a verb follows an adverb, not an adjective. Is there a grammar rule here?
    Mind you, this is not a rule, just a short description of what happens in reality:

    Some verbs are, or can be seen as, linking verbs. They merely link the subject to its complement. The most obvious linking verb is 'be', i.e.

    The morning will be misty.

    However, 'start off' also links the subject to its complement, so it is a linking verb here:

    The morning will start off misty.
    You will paint the wall blue.
    The wine will flow red.
    etc.


    So we are really talking about what the morning will be like, not how it will start off. Which is why you do not say The morning will start off mistily :cross: :D
     
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