start the appliance

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gockab

Senior Member
Polish
Do we say "start the appliance"? Or rather "switch on"? In this context it refers to a clothing iron and is a translation of a Polish manual and this is why I'd rather avoid phrasal verbs.

"We kindly ask you for careful reading these instructions before starting the appliance."
 
  • MilkyBarKid

    Senior Member
    British English
    and is a translation of a Polish manual = you are translating this into English...and we are quite familiar with phrasal verbs! :)
    So, why the reluctance?
     

    rhitagawr

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Switch on" is better. "Start" in the sense of "switch on" is wrong when you're talking about irons. However, there may be certain things you have to do before you "start using" the iron for the first time.
    I must say, though, that the distinction isn't crystal clear. You "start" the car even though starting the car is analogous to switching the iron on. I suppose "switch on" is used when you flick a switch.
    Cross-posted with milkiebarkid, with whom I agree. If you're going to avoid phrasal verbs, you'll be avoiding half the verbs in the English language.
     

    gockab

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Oh, this is just what my teacher said - that phrasal verbs are a bit too colloquial for a manual:)
    So: "We kindly ask you for careful reading these instructions before switching on the appliance." or rather "We kindly ask you for careful reading these instruction s before you switch on the appliance."
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "We kindly ask you for careful reading to read these instructions carefully BEFORE switching on the appliance."

    This is an important safety notice. It is normal to emphasise the vital word in some way - in this case before - hence the capitalised form.
     
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