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gayyyyk

Senior Member
Russian
Hello !
Which way is better to say ‘start your day with planning’ or ‘start your day by planning’ ?
As far as I know ‘with’ is used with nouns and ‘by’ with verbs.
But how it would sound in these sentences, how would you use ?
Can ‘planning’ here be used as a noun ?
 
  • Franco-filly

    Senior Member
    English - Southern England
    I would use "by planning [verb]" if you mean "by planning what you are going to do / how you are going to use your time"

    I would use "with planning [noun] if you had a task, some work, related to/called "planning" [noun] (i.e. for a party, etc.) that you needed to deal with.
     

    gayyyyk

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I would use "by planning [verb]" if you mean "by planning what you are going to do / how you are going to use your time"

    I would use "with planning [noun] if you had a task, some work, related to/called "planning" [noun] (i.e. for a party, etc.) that you needed to deal with.
    Thanks indeed
     

    taked4700

    Senior Member
    japanese japan
    Excuse me, but could you let me make sure if it is idiomatic or not?

    1. Start your day by planning what you are going to do.

    2. Start your day with planning what you are going to do.

    3. Start your day planning what you are going to do.

    To me, they seem all idiomatic.
    I guess 1. would be more possitve than 2. while 3. remains neutral.

    Am I wrong?
    Thank you in advance.
     
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