starting this spring

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pioussoul

Banned
Chinese
Ms. Levy is expected to occupy a more prominent position in our company starting this spring, upon her final return to Colorado.

I have come across the pattern in bold many times, but I have never really spent time weighing it. Furthermore, I'd like to know if native speakers' viewpoints correspond to mine.
What speech part does starting this spring belong to? A gerund or a present participle? And how does this structure derive?
Thanks.
 
  • maxiogee

    Banned
    English
    In spring (the season between winter and summer) Ms Levy will begin to occupy a more prominent role. It means that the person who wrote the piece doesn't know excatly when Ms Levy will take up the new position.
     

    pioussoul

    Banned
    Chinese
    I'm going to be a vegetarian starting next spring.

    What speech part does the phrase in bold belong to? And how and where does it derive from?
    Thanks.
     
    I'm going to be a vegetarian starting next spring.

    What speech part does the phrase in bold belong to? And how and where does it derive from?
    Thanks.
    Hi Pioussoul,

    "Starting" is the present participle of the verb "to start". Here it acts as a conjunction to make a single sentence instead of two. I'm going to be a vegetarian. I'm starting next spring.

    As to the how and why of its derivation, this will require a google search as I really don't know.

    LRV
     

    pioussoul

    Banned
    Chinese
    Hi Pioussoul,

    "Starting" is the present participle of the verb "to start". Here it acts as a conjunction to make a single sentence instead of two. I'm going to be a vegetarian. I'm starting next spring.
    As to the how and why of its derivation, this will require a google search as I really don't know.LRV
    Thanks, HER MAJESTY, for your creative and imaginative viewpoints.

    Shouldn't we expect more insightful and enlightening revelations?
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes, cuchuflete. Also, there should be a comma between "vegetarian" and "starting".

    "Starting" derives from the verb "to start". A synonym is "to begin".

    More examples of this construction:

    I intend to take more exercise, beginning next week.

    He read his book, turning the pages quickly.

    We usually travel to the seaside at the weekend, driving through the countryside


    As cuchuflete has said, the second part of such a sentence forms an adverbial phrase, describing the manner of the verb in the first part. So, "starting", describes "going to be a vegetarian". It tells us more about it.
     
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