stat and pronto

peter199083

Senior Member
Mandarin
Hi everyone,

I notice two words i.e. stat and pronto have got similar meanings, which are used at the end of a sentence to implicate the emergency or the necessity of accelerating.

May I ask you how often or frequently do you use them? Or in what contexts or senarios do those words better fit or at least sound more idiomatically?

Thanks in advance.

Peter
 
  • Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Please give some examples of these words in use.
    I have never heard of 'stat'.
    'Get over here pronto!' is a possibility.
     

    peter199083

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Please give some examples of these words in use.
    I have never heard of 'stat'.
    'Get over here pronto!' is a possibility.
    Stat is a word that I first learnt from an American drama- Grey's Anatomy as used in first aid nurses or medical assistants would always say 'Get a doctor stat.'

    But from your indifference with stat, I could infer that probably stat is only popular in America.
     
    Last edited:

    peter199083

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    You might like to look at the second definition of "stat" in the WR dictionary, peter:


    There are also several previous threads:
    Stat
    Stat
    Stat!!!
    Why does stat mean quick/hurry ?
    Thank you, Loob. I want to know more about the differences between stat and pronto, the latter of which was under-discussed in this forum. Are you willing to comment on them?
    Interestingly I first learnt 'pronto' from a British drama- Babylon Hotel.
    My intuition is that pronto is British and stat is American. Is that so?
     

    pwmeek

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Stat is almost always used in a medical context (and derives from medical Latin, although TV medical dramas may have brought it into slightly more general use).

    I don't use it, and have not heard it used in daily speech, not even while I was in hospital. Perhaps there were no emergencies near my part of the hospital. I perceive it as trade jargon. It is a short, easy-to-understand word with a specific meaning among medical people: right now, not when you finish some other non-critical task.

    Pronto is more general (and is borrowed from the Spanish, which suggests it was adopted first by cowboys in the American West and then by the rest of AE, and finally by other parts of the English-speaking world).

    (It is possible that BE has borrowed pronto directly from the Spanish, but I suspect my derivation path is correct.)

    If it was, indeed, borrowed via cowboys, it would have been a deliberate rustification (trying to sound like a cowboy) by the rest of AE speakers for a long time before entering general use.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I wouldn't use either one. Stat is medical, pronto is cowboy. If I were a range-riding doctor, I might use both: one outdoors, one indoors.

    Added: I see I'm cross-posting with pwmeek.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Interestingly I first learnt 'pronto' from a British drama- Babylon Hotel.
    Hotel Babylon presumably. I'm familiar with pronto, but never heard of stat before this thread, and I would probably not use either, like Copyright!
     

    peter199083

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    Wow, they sound very unpleasant. At first I though they were idiomatic colloquial expressions. It turns out that no natives are fond of them. Pity!
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don't think "pronto" is seen as cowboy here. I've heard it used here, but I don't think it has passed my lips. "Stat" is new to me. Since I don't work in medicine, it is not going to pass into my active vocabulary.
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top