station pitch

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audiolaik

Senior Member
Polish
Hello,

I have been racking my brains as to what the phrase in bold stands for:

"A recent, rather unusual documentary showcased not professional musicians, but London buskers who were taking part in a lincensed busking scheme which now boasts 602 performers playing at 31 station pitches in the capital."


Does it refer to the surface of a platform?:confused:

Thank you!

(Source: CAE Gold, coursebook)
 
  • A "pitch" in that context means a place where a street musician plays - that's all!

    It comes from the same idea as somebody "pitching" a tent. If you find a camp site and pitch your tent in a corner - that's your pitch.

    A busker (street musician) arrives at the place where he's going to play and arranges his mat and equipment down on the ground so that he can start playing. It becomes his "pitch".

    Previously, busking was illegal everywhere in London Underground stations. But there are now schemes to licence buskers in certain places (pitches) because many of them are highly talented and people enjoy their efforts. A good busker can lighten the bad experience of an arduous journey.
     

    audiolaik

    Senior Member
    Polish
    A "pitch" in that context means a place where a street musician plays - that's all!

    It comes from the same idea as somebody "pitching" a tent. If you find a camp site and pitch your tent in a corner - that's your pitch.

    A busker (street musician) arrives at the place where he's going to play and arranges his mat and equipment down on the ground so that he can start playing. It becomes his "pitch".

    Previously, busking was illegal everywhere in London Underground stations. But there are now schemes to licence buskers in certain places (pitches) because many of them are highly talented and people enjoy their efforts. A good busker can lighten the bad experience of an arduous journey.
    Thank you, KB, for your comprehensive explanation!
     
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