stationer

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cyaxares_died

Banned
Deutsch
I need stationery articles. On the street do I ask 'Excuse me do you know a stationer around here?' or 'Excuse me do you know a stationer's around here?'
 
  • Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    In England, one tends to say "stationer's." It's short for "stationer's shop."

    The person you're asking probably won't know the stationer personally.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In the USA it is most likely stated as, "Can you tell me where there is a Staples store nearby?"

    (Staples, Office Max and Office Depot are the 3 mega stationary supply store chains in the USA. Staples was the first.)

    This post is a natural product. The slight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and in no way should be considered flaws or defects.
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    In the USA it is most likely stated as, "Can you tell me where there is a Staples store nearby?"

    (Staples, Office Max and Office Depot are the 3 mega stationary supply store chains in the USA. Staples was the first.)

    This post is a natural product. The slight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and in no way should be considered flaws or defects.
    erm... Pack, I think you mean stationery supply stores. Most stores are stationary, unless they're on wheels. :)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    erm... Pack, I think you mean stationery supply stores. Most stores are stationary, unless they're on wheels. :)
    Often times my fingers type independently of my brain. I should principle myself more carefully (or is it principal myself more carefully?).

    Of course there is "Stationery on Wheels" office delivery service, the non-stationary stationery company.

    (Of course my signature pretty much covers me on this, don't you think?)

    This post is a natural product. The slight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and in no way should be considered flaws or defects.
     

    cyaxares_died

    Banned
    Deutsch
    In England, one tends to say "stationer's."

    That's strange, in Bath a month ago I asked on the street for a stationer's and people thought I was asking for the train station. Accent-problem maybe.
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    There are two possible reasons for this:
    1). The people you spoke to assumed that you, as a foreigner, wouldn't know what a stationer's is and would be more likely to look for the train station anyway.
    2). The people you spoke to had never heard the word themselves. One tends to say "stationer's"; other ones are limited to words of two syllables (even in Bath, I'm sorry to say).
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Yes, I'd call it a stationer's or stationery shop. (Staples is big biz here too, but you don't generally find them in the high street.)
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, I fear that if you ask your way to the stationer's in London, more often than not you'll be directed to the station. I have no idea where my nearest stationer is, and I'm sure many people round here have never even heard of a stationer.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    If I got a blank look in London, I'd follow it up with Office supplies shop ~ you know, pens, paper, that kind of thing ~ do you speak English, by the way?:D
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I would be asking for a stationery shop.
    (It's often useful to offer the opportunity for a supposedly witty response. It promotes a feeling of well-being and, by introducing an element of the straight-man/funny-man relationship, encourages a more co-operative follow-up.)
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hey, Ewie. Do you believe Panj??

    I think, Panj, you would have much the same problem as Cyaxares had in Bath, if you happened to encounter the same people. Most train stations in cities as big as Bath also have shops in them. And the joke would be lost on the people who have never heard of stationery (apparently, according to Teddy, a lot of them live in London).
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I blame the education system, myself. That and the end of free welfare orange juice.
    But I'd expect to be understood if I was asking for a stationery shop. Could be completely wrong, of course.
     
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