statutory language ["make out and record...the said seal"]

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wangzhizhou

New Member
Chinese
In section 4 of the "Act to provide for the safe-keeping of the Acts, Records and Seal of the United States, and for other purposes", it is provided that the Secretary of the State shall keep the great seal of the U.S., and

"to make out and record, and affix the said seal to all civil commissions to officers of the United States to be appointed by the President, by and with the consent of the Senate, or by the President alone..."

I have a hard time in understanding the expression "to make out and record...the said seal". Maybe it is already wrong to connect the "to make out and record" part with the "said seal" for comprehension. Could anyone help me out and offer a line of plain English that may well capture the meaning of the statutory language? Or at least point out the right way to comprehend this statutory language?

Thank you so much!
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    • The Secretary of the State shall keep the great seal of the U.S.
    • He shall make out and record all civil commissions to officers of the United States.
    • Having done that, he shall affix the seal to those civil commissions.
    • There are two ways in which these officers of the United States can be appointed: a) by the President, by and with the consent of the Senate, or b) by the President alone.
     

    wangzhizhou

    New Member
    Chinese
    Thank you so much, Keith!

    • The Secretary of the State shall keep the great seal of the U.S.
    • He shall make out and record all civil commissions to officers of the United States.
    • Having done that, he shall affix the seal to those civil commissions.
    • There are two ways in which these officers of the United States can be appointed: a) by the President, by and with the consent of the Senate, or b) by the President alone.
     
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