stay friends with someone

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tufguy

Senior Member
hindi
I would like to know about "stay friends with someone" and "I can't be someone's friend no more". For example "I thought Tim was a great person but today I came to know he is a very cunning person. 'I can't be his friend no more' or 'I can't stay friends with him after knowing his reality'."
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "I can't be someone's friend no more".:cross:-> Can you please correct the double negative?:thumbsup:
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "I can't be someone's friend no more".:cross: This is wrong. If you can't be friends no more, you can be friends some more.

    Where did you find the sentence 'I can't be his friend no more'? - It is bad English.
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    "I can't be someone's friend no more".:cross: This is wrong. If you can't be friends no more, you can be friends some more.

    Where did you find the sentence 'I can't be his friend no more'? - It is bad English.
    Nowhere, it is mine.

    If you can't be friends no more, you can be friends some more. Is it correct? "You can be friends some more" what does it mean? Does it mean you can remain friends for some more time?

    We can't be friends no more.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    tufguy, PaulQ is trying to help you correct the double negative in your sentence. Please take another look at it.
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    tufguy, PaulQ is trying to help you correct the double negative in your sentence. Please take another look at it.
    Sorry, I am confused is this "If you can't be friends no more, you can be friends some more" incorrect?

    Could you please explain?
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    In your context, it seems that you want to say that you want to stop being his friend. We say this as "I can't be his friend any more", not "...no more."
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "If you can't be friends no more, you can be friends some more" is just a way of explaining why the double negative in "If can't be his friend no more" makes your sentence mean the opposite of what you're trying to say.

    Here's another example of a double negative.

    "I don't have no apples" means "I do have some apples."

    To make a negative statement, we generally put only one negative in the sentence.

    [Cross-posted with Edinburgher]
     

    tufguy

    Senior Member
    hindi
    In your context, it seems that you want to say that you want to stop being his friend. We say this as "I can't be his friend any more", not "...no more."
    Oh, okay now I understand. Thank you.

    "I can't be his friend any more" or "I can't stay friends with him after knowing his reality".

    "Can't stay friends with someone" is it correct? "I can't stay friends with him after knowing his reality".
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "Can't stay friends with him" is fine in your sentence. You might want to rethink "knowing his reality," but we can't discuss that phrase in this thread.
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Yes, that's okay, although I think "I don't want to" might be better than "I can't". You are making a decision, not stating an inability.
     
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