stay out of the weeds

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margapi

Member
spanish, costa rica
Hi everybody. I can´t find any translation for that. Any clues? This expression is part of a list of duties of a restaurant manager. Thanks
 
  • bouncy.bouncy

    Senior Member
    American/British English
    It means, "don't say too much that the customer doesn't need/want to know."
    I believe this is the case, but I'm not entirely sure.
     

    jabogitlu

    Senior Member
    USA-English
    It is also sometimes used to mean, "don't micromanage something." In this case I guess it would be let your workers carry on with their duties without too much interference as long as things are running smoothly. But I'm not sure that this is the case here, because I think that would make for a very poor manager!
     

    Rick Shaw

    Member
    English, USA
    Hi,

    I have a friend who used to be a waiter. He describes waiters/waitresses who are overwhelmed when things get busy as "in the weeds". I hope that helps a little bit.

    Regards,

    R.S.
     

    Perdido

    Senior Member
    EEUU
    I completely agree with jabogitlu: "stay out of the weeds" usually means "don't micromanage" or "don't get bogged down in the details."
     
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