Stay Safe

ThomasK

Senior Member
Belgium, Dutch
I would like to hear NOT about the literal translation, but about how you that instruction/... is formulated in your language.

Dutch: "Blijf in uw kot!" Lit. "remain in your hut/hutch". ----- I think it was not developed by a PR bureau but a funny reaction by our Minister of Health when being asked about details for distance and picked by the media. But "kot" is literally like the dog's kennel/..., so some dilapidated safe place for an animal, built with few means and dirty of course because dogs don't clean of course. It became the word for students' rooms around here as a typical male student's room was like that: a mess, not clean, etc., even adopted by French-speaking fellow Belgians. It is also informally used to refer to one's home, but ironically of course, but maintaining the idea of some cosiness, I think. Some people object to the slogan because of the connotation, but it works: short, forceful (two plosives, two short key words), etc.
 
  • Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    The English idiomatically say "Stay safe and take care", but in French we usually just say:
    Prends soin de toi [pʁɑ̃ swɛ̃ də twa]
    or:
    Prenez soin de vous [pʁəne swɛ̃ də vu]
    (literally Take care of you)
     
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    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    It is very strange but somehow I have come to read that as "Take care of yourself [as we won't be doing it]", whereas I suppose that is just my idea, not shared by a lot of people...
     
    In Greek the most common one is «να είσαι/είστε καλά» [na ˈi.se kaˈla] (2nd p. sinɡ. or informal)/[na ˈi.ste kaˈla] (2nd p. pl. or formal) --> You be well (I wish you were safe, sound, healthy etc).
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    I'd feel like asking about the various meanings of /kalos/ but that might lead us astray. However, in our Flemish newspaper I came across an expression in a title on whether or not to celebrate Easter in Church in Greece, ending in "... skiti", but I cannot trace it...

    @Yendred: so, that little word makes a difference. I think in English 'yourself' is the most common (I think "of you" is not used even). But those are the pecularities of languages, I suppose!
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    But those are the pecularities of languages, I suppose!
    Yes I guess this is because Take care of you is ambiguous.
    As Prends soin de toi and Prenez soin de vous cannot be confused, Take care of you can both address a single person or a group, while Take care of yourself/yourselves removes ambiguity.
     
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    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    You may well know that England [sic] has now changed its wording to "Stay Alert". None of the other nations of the UK have done this, and retain "Stay Home". The former is creating ambiguity and confusion amongst many UK citizens as well as the fact that any messages the Prime Minister invokes with them are usually policies of an England-only nature (something he never mentions.)

    As for the Welsh version of "Stay Home", this unfortunately (in my opinion) has been interpreted by many translators as the verbal-noun (equivalent of the infinitive and gerund in my language) and not as imperative 2nd pers. plur. (equivalent of French 'vous'). Coupled with that, some sign writers do not know the difference between 'adref' (homewards) and 'gartref' (at home, chez soi).
     

    Yendred

    Senior Member
    Français - France
    Oh you meant "Stay home", the instruction addressed at citizens during COVID-19 lockdown...
    Then in French the corresponding instruction is "Restez à la maison", which is a literal translation.
    In France, today May 11th, is the first day of unlockdown, and the instruction was changed to "Restez prudent" (literally Stay careful).
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    You were using the "we" form then. Interesting. Ours was/is a straightforward imperative, but the irony compensates for the apparently harsh tone. Is there a special reason for this change, do you think? (Just very briefly: is /asfalis/ based on the a-privatus + an ad.?)
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    As for the Welsh version of "Stay Home", this unfortunately (in my opinion) has been interpreted by many translators as the verbal-noun (equivalent of the infinitive and gerund in my language) and not as imperative 2nd pers. plur. (equivalent of French 'vous'). Coupled with that, some sign writers do not know the difference between 'adref' (homewards) and 'gartref' (at home, chez soi).
    What should it be? Arhoswch gartref? Is aros the correct verb-noun in this case?
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    For Stoggler,

    Arhoswch (< aros) gartref I suggest is the correct form in this case

    Arhos-wch + Soft Mutation + gartref
    Stay (sometimes 'stop'), you 2nd pers. plur. IMP., at home

    Incidentally, berfenw is translated as 'verbal-noun', not 'verb-noun'.
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Surprised at that, Stoggler. I've always learnt the expression verbal-noun as in verbal-adjective (not verb-adjective).
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Take care of you can both address a single person or a group
    That’s not the reason we don’t say it. We also don’t say “They took care of them” even though there’s no ambiguity. And there are innumerable sentences with “you” that are said on a daily basis by millions of native speakers, that could be argued to be ambiguous, but we say them anyway and most of the time context clarifies the meaning.

    In short, we use “yourself/yourselves” for grammatical reasons — not to eliminate ambiguity.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Yes. Any other argument than the reflexive directly implies that its referent is NOT the same as for the agent. I.e. "they took care of them" means that Group 1 took care of some non-identical Group 2. Since "you" is a locutor and not an anaphoric pronoun, and always has the same referent in the same context, the sentence (at least in its basic understanding) contains mutually exclusive parameters and is therefore ungrammatical. However, I can think about the situation when the speaker adresses a single person and the object "you" refers to some group which includes that person. Doesn't it make "take care of you" possible and meaningful by any chance, I wonder?..
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I can think about the situation when the speaker adresses a single person and the object "you" refers to some group which includes that person. Doesn't it make "take care of you" possible and meaningful by any chance, I wonder?..
    No, that doesn’t work.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Curiously, it doesn't work well in Russian too, even despite its capability to differentiate 2p.sg. and 2p.pl. Pozabót'sya(imp.sg.) o vás (2p.pl.prep) doesn't sound well at all, and the polite plural would make it even worse. Probably it has something to do with inclusivity.
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    Just BTW; we had a plural when I was born, and some 15 years later we lost it. Why? God knows... It has, however, not changed/ impacted my life. ;-) It may be useful, but not necessary. Of course in French there is some ambiguity, I suppose: écoutez could refer to polite form "vous" and plural "vous". Or am I mistaken?
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    In Catalan, as usual, in the Gallo-Iberian doublet restar/quedar-se, the first one has become rather formal or literary, the latter being the most usual. So we could say, as in French or Italian, resteu a casa. (Or also, with romandre, another rather formal/literary verb, romaneu a casa, cognate to the Italian rimanere). But the common way these days is the Iberian one, so we say queda't a casa (you) / quedeu-vos a casa (you all).
     

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    I would like to hear NOT about the literal translation, but about how you that instruction/... is formulated in your language.

    Dutch: "Blijf in uw kot!" Lit. "remain in your hut/hutch".

    Macedonian:

    Чувајте се!
    (Čuvájte se!) [t͡ʃu'vaj.tɛ.sɛ] lit. "Keep/guard yourselves!"; plural and polite
    Чувај се! (Čúvaj se!) ['t͡ʃu.vaj.sɛ] lit. "Keep/guard yourself!"


    чува (čúva) v. 3p.sg. = "keep", "care", "protect", "guard", "save"
     
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