stay upwind of him

VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
In the kitchen, Oliver's trying to catch a fly. Barbara says it's on the fridge now. He's sneaking up to it to kill the fly, she says:
- Stay upwind of him.
The War of the Roses, movie

How do you understand the phrase?
Thank you.
 
  • http://www.fieldandstream.com/answe...-really-new-difference-between-upwind-and-dow
    Ok this may sound like a stupid question but i never really ...


    Jul 13, 2009 - If a deer is downwind of you, he'll smell you, if he's upwind of you, he won't smell you. You may be able to .... Just remember to keep the wind in your face when hunting.
    =====

    Hunter----Prey
    Wind ===>


    SITUATION TO BE AVOIDED (above)
    Here the prey is downwind of the hunter and will smell him. The hunter is upwind of the prey.

    ===

    If your quotation is accurate, the speakers have mistakenly reversed the correct rule.
     
    Last edited:

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Interesting possibility, Vik! The film is about marital strife, so maybe the wife is trying to help the fly and hinder the husband!
    According to your quote, she, if she really talks to the fly, tries to help Oliver:) (if the fly is upwind of Oliver, it won't smell him)
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    She is trying to help the husband catch the fly. She is saying it in a joking way as if they are both stalking larger game, in the way bennymix described.
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    She is saying to her husband to stay upwind of the fly, in case the fly "smells" him. The fly is more likely to see the husband, which is also why it's a minor joke.

    So, the husband and wife are acting like hunters stalking the fly.
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Yes, you are right. No wonder you're confused....I am too now!:) It's hard not being able to see it, because of all the visual and tone clues we usually pick up from situations like this.

    They do sometimes make mistakes in films. I saw one this afternoon called North See Hijack, where the main character describes his childhood and says "Both my parents died in childbirth". To which my immediate reaction was "why both of them?".

    As the War of the Roses is about marital strife, I think the key will depend on what happened in the scene immediately before this point. If they were in a period where they were getting on, then it sounds as if the line is either some weird humour, or a mistake. If they weren't getting on then it sounds as if she is deliberately saying things to distract, or hinder, him.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    I'm not sure which period it is, maybe I haven't reached the scenes where they fight really hard and then get on yet:D.

    Thank you!
     

    Trochfa

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    You're welcome, :)

    I've just read the synopsis, and it is a "black comedy", which is one where the subject matter and the humour can be controversial. That does make it sound like she is trying to hinder him, and is making a sort of sick joke. It also stars Kathleen Turner who is renowned for her roles in films with that type of humour, such as Serial Mom which I think is brilliant, but which many people probably hate.
     
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