steep in working?

kira_moondance

Senior Member
Vietnamese
They want to become eminent, but few can really steep in working to make their dreams come true.
A person on the internet had correct my sentence like this "They want to become eminent, but few can really put in the work to make their dreams come true."
I really need to use the word "steep" because I'm learning new words by making sentences. How could I use that word in the sentence?
 
  • icecreamsoldier

    Senior Member
    New Zealand English
    Your original sentence doesn't make sense.
    Using 'steep' in this way is quite old-fashioned, but you could say "...steep themselves in their work...".
     

    kira_moondance

    Senior Member
    Vietnamese
    They want to become eminent, but few can really steep in working to make their dreams come true.

    I thought I used that word in figurative sense.
    I found this one in a SAT book: "
    A young man who has read the life story of every eminent athlete of the twentieth century, or a coed who has steeped herself in every social-protest novel she can get her hands on, may very well be learning all there is to know in a very limited area."

    I don't understand the meaning of the above sentence very well, but I think the way I used "steep" is similar to the way the author used "steeped" in that sentence.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    ...I think the way I used "steep" is similar to the way the author used "steeped" in that sentence.
    The big difference between your usage on the one hand, and that in the sample sentence and the usage suggested by icecreamsoldier on the other, is the "herself" or "themselves." You need that to complete the expression for the meaning you want. "To steep" without the reflexive pronoun most often means (as correctly posted by GreenWhiteBlue) to soak something, such as tea, in hot water.
     
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